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Hugh Possingham, chief scientist of the NGO The Nature Conservancy, who presented in Colombia this week a controversial mathematical formula that measures the cost-benefit of saving different species, in order to decide which should be given priority. EFE/NGO The Nature Conservancy
EFE

Math has already been used effectively in defining protected areas in places with productive activities in 150 countries over the past 15 years. The best example of that application is Australia's Great Barrier Reef, where a software called Marxan permitted the expansion of protected areas from 5 percent to 35 percent while preserving species and improving fishing. 

Could a Mathematical Formula stop the extinction of species?

 07/26/2017 - 07:11
Hugh Possingham, chief scientist of the NGO The Nature Conservancy, who presented in Colombia this week a controversial mathematical formula that measures the cost-benefit of saving different species, in order to decide which should be given priority. EFE/NGO The Nature Conservancy

Math has already been used effectively in defining protected areas in places with productive activities in 150 countries over the past 15 years. The best example of that application is Australia's Great Barrier Reef, where a software called Marxan permitted the expansion of protected areas from 5 percent to 35 percent while preserving species and improving fishing. 

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EFE

[OP-ED]: Our Education, Born from Swamps

 05/15/2017 - 15:27
In lower income neighborhoods, students can struggle without access to proper educational materials, exposure, and parental poverty. 

The story of education in lower income neighborhoods is an all too familiar one. The struggle to obtain a stable education is a story of overcoming conditions that are less than favorable, much like the swamp plant. What is causing these students, especially Latinos, to fall behind? How can they grow from these meager and impoverished conditions?  

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[OP-ED]: Is your phone eavesdropping on your conversation about cannibalism? Mine may have.

 03/08/2017 - 18:41

Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you were to read biology professor Bill Schutt’s new book “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” you’d have lots to talk about at the dinner table.

There are, for instance, sections on how cannibalism is portrayed in popular culture, news stories and historical texts. Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Meaningful work need not be ‘fun’

 02/16/2017 - 10:21
Snagging a decent paying job as an accountant, lawyer, engineer, doctor or any sort of analyst takes an awful lot of time and intellectual effort, none of which could accurately be described as “fun.”

My students know I care deeply about them. They know I love to joke around and keep things interesting as we investigate topics they might find dry. But they also know I am waging a one-woman crusade against “fun.”

It’s not that I don’t like to have fun, it’s just that young people moving from high school to college and, ultimately, into adult life have to understand that achievement -- be it academic or career-related -- is hard work. And hard work is many things, like character-building, but rarely is it giggles-all-day fun.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda