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Secretary of State

Trump's new Afghan strategy

 08/22/2017 - 05:12
Afghan refugees wait to be processed at a border post in Quetta, Pakistan, on Monday, Aug. 21. EFE/Jamal Taraqai

In a televised speech, Trump said he wants to expand US military intervention in Afghanistan and South Asia. However, he didn't give specific detail on how he plans to do it, how many troops he would commit or how he would evaluate success. 

Plain Text Author: 
Andrea Rodés/ EFE

[OP-ED]: The Art of the Bluff

 08/15/2017 - 15:13
Trump has made clear that the United States would respond to North Korean nuclear threats with a massive military strike, possibly involving nuclear weapons. EFE

How did we get here? Why does it appear that we’re on the brink of a war in Asia, one that could involve nuclear weapons? North Korea has had nuclear-weapons capacity for at least 10 years now. Have its recent advances been so dramatic and significant to force the United States to wage a preventive war? No. The crisis we now find ourselves in has been exaggerated and mishandled by the Trump administration to a degree that is deeply worrying and dangerous.

[OP-ED]: On North Korea, hope is not a strategy

 07/11/2017 - 15:46
Kim Jong Un is a young man but has been highly effective at preserving his authority. He has secured the support of the military and sidelined or killed anyone who threatened his grip on power -- including his uncle and, allegedly, his half-brother. EFE

In Washington, there is a conventional wisdom on North Korea that spans both parties and much of elite opinion. It goes roughly like this: North Korea is the world’s most bizarre country, run by a crackpot dictator with a strange haircut. He is unpredictable and irrational and cannot be negotiated with. Eventually this weird and cruel regime will collapse. Meanwhile, the only solution is more and more pressure. But what if the conventional wisdom is wrong?

Washington's Priority in Latin America: Ending Drug Trade

 06/16/2017 - 06:30
US Vice President Mike Pence shakes hands with Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez (L) during the opening of the Conference on Prosperity and Security in Central America in Miami, Florida, United States, 15 June 2017. EFE/Giorgio Viera

US Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson met with the presidents of Guatemala and Honduras and the vice president of El Salvador within the framework of the economic and security conference on Central America being held in Miami. The Alliance for Prosperity in the Northern Triangle was created in 2014 by the US, Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador due to the wave of US arrivals of undocumented and unaccompanied Central American minors. 

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

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Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez on Tuesday met in Washington with US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and various lawmakers. EPA/SHAWN THEW
AL DIA News

Former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson has said he did not want to be US secretary of state and only took the job because his wife convinced him to do it, as reported in The Guardian.