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No papers, no scholarship: Latino budding scientist becomes food truck chef

 06/20/2017 - 06:39
Dreamer Lorenzo Santillan in Phoenix, Arizona, United States. EFE/Beatriz Limon

After winning a prestigious robotics contest, Dreamer Lorenzo Santillan had the chance to become a scientist, but his immigration status kept him from getting a university scholarship and he had to find an alternative, which turned out to be a traveling food truck that he calls "Neither Here Nor There."

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: Rather than heading to the silver screen, take a moment this summer to look inward

 06/16/2017 - 12:30
Try Michael Sandel’s “Justice: What’s the Right Thing To Do?,” which covers a wide range of thought provoking questions about civic life and describes the philosophical foundations for competing impulses. (The wonderful 12-hour Harvard lecture series is available to view on YouTube, as well.)

 Last week, I packed my husband and two sons off to enjoy their much-anticipated viewing of the new superhero movie “Wonder Woman.”

I used to partake in such outings to the summer action blockbuster, but by the time “Wonder Woman” came out, I was already sick and tired of being browbeaten by countless feminine-power “hot takes” and “think pieces,” plus the inevitable reports of outrage.

[OP-ED]: Retreat at Mar-a-Lago: Passing the baton to China

 03/22/2017 - 08:31
El primer ministro chino dijo que China está comprometida con la apertura de su economía, aunque el proceso se llevará a cabo gradualmente.

We do not yet have the official agenda for next month’s meeting at Mar-a-Lago between Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping. But after 75 years of American leadership on the world stage, we might be watching the beginning of a handover of power from the United States to China.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

[OP-ED]: Is your phone eavesdropping on your conversation about cannibalism? Mine may have.

 03/08/2017 - 18:41

Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you were to read biology professor Bill Schutt’s new book “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” you’d have lots to talk about at the dinner table.

There are, for instance, sections on how cannibalism is portrayed in popular culture, news stories and historical texts. Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda