running

Latest Stories

A woman from Mexico's Tarahumara indigenous community has won a 50km (31 miles) ultramarathon wearing sandals. FOTOGRAPHIX

The Tarahumara are famous for being excellent runners.

[OP-ED]: The curse of middle-aged capitalism -- for Trump and all of us

 08/21/2017 - 13:57
In 1995, the largest five firms by market “capitalization” (the value of a company’s shares) were old-line businesses: Exxon, AT&T, Coca Cola, General Electric and Merck. By 2015, only Exxon (now Exxon Mobil) remained.

 A persisting puzzle about the U.S. economy is how it can seem both strong and weak. On the one hand, it remains a citadel of innovation, producing new companies like Uber. On the other, the economy is expanding at a snail’s pace of 2 percent annually since 2010. How could both be true? Why isn’t innovation translating into faster growth? The answer -- or part of the answer -- is that American businesses are running on two separate tracks. Call them the “youthful” and “middle-aged” tracks.

[OP-ED]: Does ‘executive function’ play a role in how likely police officers are to use deadly force?

 07/13/2017 - 11:13
Study of the Philadelphia police was unique because of its access to such a deep trove of information on officers, as most departments do not make such data available. File

The concept of “executive function” was popularized by social science research showing that young children who can control their impulses, pay attention, remember details, manage their time and plan are more likely to be successful in school.

[OP-ED]: Trump’s trade trap

 07/11/2017 - 15:30
Trump may believe that trade and environmental issues can be kept separate from geopolitical matters, such as North Korea’s nuclear program. On the contrary, history suggests that trade and geopolitics go hand in hand. EFE

Donald Trump’s foreign policy, such as it is, rests on a massive and apparently indestructible contradiction. Trump wants the United States to remain the “essential” nation, the best embodiment of Western ideals of freedom and democracy, while at the same time deliberately alienating many of our traditional “allies,” whose support the United States desperately needs. American leadership becomes difficult, if not impossible.

[OP-ED]: The perils of assuming anything about the Latino vote

 05/18/2017 - 08:20
You don’t need to be a political scientist to figure out a few simple truths: In raw numbers, more and more Hispanics will cast ballots in upcoming elections -- as has been the case for the past 36 years.

At the outset of their new book, “Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign,” Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes note that adviser David Plouffe prioritized three goals for Clinton to win: “It was important to have the right culture and mission, to manage Bill Clinton, and to effectively target Latino voters.”

We know how well that turned out.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: ‘Sexual paranoia’ arrives on campus

 04/20/2017 - 08:21
Kipnis bends over backward to repeatedly and vehemently note that she is (a) a certified left-wing feminist and (b) absolute in her belief that women should be safe from harm on campus, at work and everywhere else.

If Laura Kipnis thought she was under fire in 2015 after writing an essay for The Chronicle of Higher Education criticizing an emergent “sexual paranoia” on college campuses, then her new book will surely catapult her into public-enemy No. 1 status in the eyes of legions of angry feminists.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

Philly Grows Into Its Anarchist Shoe

 03/29/2017 - 09:18
Wooden Shoe es una librería que encierra una atmósfera distinta a la de otros establecimientos dedicados a la venta de libros, aquí el enfoque es colaborativo y político. La librería está ubicada en el 704 South Street.  Foto Archivo Particular.

Past a chalkboard that says, “Come inside to read a good book,” on one side and “Don’t be an asshole!” on the other, you come across a tattered SEPTA Union Strike poster from the early twentieth century, preserved underneath an equally withered-away lamination. A few cautious inches deep inside of this surreal time machine, a pillar manages to stand from the 1890s home of an anarchist feminist writer and speaker who lived near Drexel University.