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Dr. Jess Carbino, a native from Philly, is Bumble's Sociologist and an online dating and relationship expert. 

AL DÍA interviewed Dr. Jess Carbino, a native of Philadelphia, and online dating and relationship expert. She currently serves as Sociologist at Bumble, a dating app where women make the first move.

[OP-ED]: Does ‘executive function’ play a role in how likely police officers are to use deadly force?

 07/13/2017 - 11:13
Study of the Philadelphia police was unique because of its access to such a deep trove of information on officers, as most departments do not make such data available. File

The concept of “executive function” was popularized by social science research showing that young children who can control their impulses, pay attention, remember details, manage their time and plan are more likely to be successful in school.

[OP-ED]: For those struggling with anxiety, harness the power of positive writing

 07/11/2017 - 10:23
Then Janice Kaplan’s book “The Gratitude Diaries: How a Year Looking on the Bright Side Can Transform Your Life” came out, promising that by just being thankful one could crowd out negative thoughts

Two years ago, anxiety was keeping me up at night, threatening to spiral out of control. Meanwhile, my husband with his easy confidence -- never seeing a raincloud without a silver lining, always constructing the best possible scenario when confronted with a set of hazy details -- slept like a baby. I decided I wanted that kind of peace in my life.

 

[OP-ED]: Is the American Dream killing us?

 04/04/2017 - 10:31
One theory attributes the spike in “deaths of despair” to growing income inequality. There would be fewer suicides, drug overdoses and alcohol-related deaths if incomes were distributed more equally, the argument goes. People take out their frustrations and anger by resorting to self-destructive behavior.

It isn’t often that economics raises the most profound questions of human existence, but recent work of economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton (husband and wife, both of Princeton University) comes close. You may recall that a few years ago, Case and Deaton reported the startling finding that the death rates of non-Hispanic middle-aged whites had gotten worse — they were dying younger.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Don’t tell your children that you’re not good at math

 02/09/2017 - 08:07
We carry emotional baggage about our own schooling, relationships with our parents and their expectations. This is layered over the hopes and dreams we have for our own kids, making it challenging to always be positive and constructive.
 
 

There is an emerging education trend I’ve noticed that will hopefully sweep the nation: Asking the adults in children’s lives to not bad-mouth themselves about math.

The first time I noticed it was several years ago at an orientation for parents at my younger son’s new middle school. The principal was trying to explain that the math standards on the statewide achievement test were going up and that it might be noticeable in work that was coming home at night.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Helping kids handle the ‘Trump Effect’ in our nation’s schools

 01/24/2017 - 14:13

In North Carolina, a high school teacher said she has “Latino students who carry their birth certificates and Social Security cards to school because they are afraid they will be deported.”
 

A new study by the Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights advocacy organization, says that more than two-thirds of 2,000 teachers surveyed reported students -- mainly immigrants, children of immigrants and Muslims -- expressing concerns or fears about what might happen to them or their families during a Trump presidency.

Since the election, more than half of teachers have seen an increase in uncivil political discourse in their schools or classrooms, and more than one-third report having observed an increase in anti-Muslim or anti-immigrant sentiment.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda