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U.S. President Donald Trump attends the ceremonial swearing-in of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the State Department in Washington, D.C. on May 2, 2018. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images).

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that the U.S. government will not receive more than 30,000 refugees in 2019, considerably reducing the cap of 45,000 accepted during 2018.

[OP-ED]: On North Korea, hope is not a strategy

 07/11/2017 - 15:46
Kim Jong Un is a young man but has been highly effective at preserving his authority. He has secured the support of the military and sidelined or killed anyone who threatened his grip on power -- including his uncle and, allegedly, his half-brother. EFE

In Washington, there is a conventional wisdom on North Korea that spans both parties and much of elite opinion. It goes roughly like this: North Korea is the world’s most bizarre country, run by a crackpot dictator with a strange haircut. He is unpredictable and irrational and cannot be negotiated with. Eventually this weird and cruel regime will collapse. Meanwhile, the only solution is more and more pressure. But what if the conventional wisdom is wrong?

Latin America closer to refugee crisis than it thinks, UNHCR says

 06/20/2017 - 17:40
Photo of the regional representative for Central America, Cuba and Mexico of the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the Ecuadorian Jose Samaniego, telling EFE in an interview on June 19, 2019, that "year after year" the number of refugees, applicants for asylum and displaced persons in the region "continues to rise because of conflicts, violence and human rights violations." EFE/Alejandro Bolivar

The regional representative for Central America, Cuba and Mexico of the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the Ecuadorian Jose Samaniego, said that "year after year" the number of refugees, applicants for asylum and displaced persons "continues to rise because of conflicts, violence and human rights violations."

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

Honduran woman saves herself, family from violent extortion gang

 04/12/2017 - 07:42
Undated photo provided on Apr. 11, 2017 showing 37-year-old Honduran citizen Carolina, who fled from their native Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, because for over a year Barrio 18 members had demanded more and more protection money every week to "watch over your business." EFE/Sashenka Gutierrez

Carolina and her family fled from their native Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, because for over a year Barrio 18 members had demanded more and more protection money every week to "watch over your business."Their original destination had been the United States until Donald Trump's arrival in the White House temporarily put the brakes on that idea.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

Justicia de EEUU convierte en indefinido el bloqueo al veto migratorio Trump

 03/30/2017 - 04:14
People carrying inflatable rafts, a form of transportation used by refugees, march against the Trump administration's proposed immigration and refugee policies in front of a Trump Building in lower Manhattan in New York, New York, USA, 28 March 2017. EPA/JUSTIN LANE

Un juez convirtió este miércoles en indefinido el hasta ahora bloqueo temporal que regía sobre el segundo veto migratorio con el que el presidente, Donald Trump, pretendía prohibir la entrada a ciudadanos de seis países de mayoría musulmana y a los refugiados.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

Philly Grows Into Its Anarchist Shoe

 03/29/2017 - 09:18
Wooden Shoe es una librería que encierra una atmósfera distinta a la de otros establecimientos dedicados a la venta de libros, aquí el enfoque es colaborativo y político. La librería está ubicada en el 704 South Street.  Foto Archivo Particular.

Past a chalkboard that says, “Come inside to read a good book,” on one side and “Don’t be an asshole!” on the other, you come across a tattered SEPTA Union Strike poster from the early twentieth century, preserved underneath an equally withered-away lamination. A few cautious inches deep inside of this surreal time machine, a pillar manages to stand from the 1890s home of an anarchist feminist writer and speaker who lived near Drexel University.

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