Advertisement

read

Latest Stories

Try Michael Sandel’s “Justice: What’s the Right Thing To Do?,” which covers a wide range of thought provoking questions about civic life and describes the philosophical foundations for competing impulses. (The wonderful 12-hour Harvard lecture series is available to view on YouTube, as well.)

 Last week, I packed my husband and two sons off to enjoy their much-anticipated viewing of the new superhero movie “Wonder Woman.”

I used to partake in such outings to the summer action blockbuster, but by the time “Wonder Woman” came out, I was already sick and tired of being browbeaten by countless feminine-power “hot takes” and “think pieces,” plus the inevitable reports of outrage.

[OP-ED]: Both Trump and the media love wrestling in the mud

 08/21/2017 - 12:19
There’s no evidence behind the terrible accusation that Trump is in league with white supremacists. When he declared in his Monday remarks from the White House that “racism is evil,” I bought it. EFE

In keeping with the recent meme of recognizing bad behavior “on many sides,” there was something that was painfully obvious during last week’s improv news-conference-like-no-other in the lobby of Trump Tower: President Trump and the media deserve each other. Both are driven by ego and take criticism personally. Both will twist the facts to defend themselves and push their agenda. And both love to wrestle in the mud.

Mexicans Protest Against NAFTA talks, as Their Government Fights to Save It

 08/17/2017 - 06:11
Civil organizations demonstrate to protest the start of NAFTA renegotiations, in the streets of Mexico City, Mexico, 16 August 2017. EPA/Jose Mendez

While Mexican government negotiators fight to save the North American Free Trade Agreement during talks in Washington, thousands of members of social and trade unions on Wednesday protested in Mexico City against the deal, claiming it marginalizes local farmers and hurts the country.

Plain Text Author: 
Andrea Rodés/ EFE

Dolores del Río: Cuando la leyenda se convierte en un Doodle de Google

 08/09/2017 - 14:56
"Celebrating Dolores del Río" by Google 

Mucho antes de que los rostros de Ana de la Reguera, Kate del Castillo, Penélope Cruz y Salma Hayek abandonaran las portadas de la  ¡HOLA! y Vanidades para embellecer los tabloides de Hollywood y las colas de las salas ACME, había existido ya una belleza española de gran talento: Dolores del Río.

 

[OP-ED]: Trump is but the latest politician to serenade Youngstown

 08/04/2017 - 08:03
It’s no surprise that Trump returned to the familiar theme of demonizing Latino immigrants. The surprise is that he chose to do it in Youngstown of all places -- a city with a minuscule immigrant population, located in a state where the Latino population is just 3.7 percent. EFE

Youngstown again? As an avid spectator of politics, I’ve been hearing about that city in the Mahoning Valley of northeast Ohio for decades. Although it’s home to just 64,000 people, Youngstown gets more than its share of attention from politicians, media, filmmakers, and even a poetic singer/songwriter from Freehold, New Jersey.

Dolores del Río: When Legends become Doodles

 08/03/2017 - 13:48
"Celebrating Dolores del Río" by Google 

Acclaimed "Golden Age" Mexican actress Dolores del Río is honored today in a floral Google Doodle as gorgeous as she was. A society heiress, a mistress to Orson Welles, a victim of McCarthyism, a spokeswoman for UNICEF, and a beauty that reportedly slept "sixteen hours a day" to keep her youthful looks, here's a look at the life of Dolores. 

[OP-ED]: For those struggling with anxiety, harness the power of positive writing

 07/11/2017 - 10:23
Then Janice Kaplan’s book “The Gratitude Diaries: How a Year Looking on the Bright Side Can Transform Your Life” came out, promising that by just being thankful one could crowd out negative thoughts

Two years ago, anxiety was keeping me up at night, threatening to spiral out of control. Meanwhile, my husband with his easy confidence -- never seeing a raincloud without a silver lining, always constructing the best possible scenario when confronted with a set of hazy details -- slept like a baby. I decided I wanted that kind of peace in my life.

 

[OP-ED]: In today’s immigration debate, even the truth is controversial

 06/29/2017 - 09:28
Acting Director of Immigration and Customs Thomas Homan talks about the immigration policies of the Trump administration during a press conference in the press room James Brady of the White House in Washington. EFE

How absurd has the immigration debate become? This absurd: It is now considered controversial when people simply tell the truth. 

As when the acting director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement explains the cold reality that anyone in the United States without the proper legal documents “should be concerned” about being apprehended and deported.

In Search of the Maya World: From Central America to Philadelphia

 06/27/2017 - 14:26
Gallery of archaeological pieces of Mayan culture exhibited at the Museum of Archeology and Anthropology of the University of Pennsylvania. Photo: Supplied UPEnn

One of the most intriguing mysteries of Latin American culture is what happened to the Maya civilization. How come after over 3,000 years of history, from about 2, 500 BC to 950 AD, most of the glorious Maya centers in Mesoamerica were abandoned? Before the arrival of the Europeans in the 1500’s magnificent cities like Tikal in Guatemala and Copán in Honduras had all but disappeared; left uninhabited, they were covered by thick jungle growth, hidden throughout the mountains and the lowlands. 

Author: 

[OP-ED]: By all means, take issue with ‘The Bell Curve.’ But read it first

 06/23/2017 - 08:47
t’s a shame that the controversy regarding “The Bell Curve” centered on the book’s delineation of the differences in measured intelligence between blacks and whites

When “The Bell Curve” by Charles A. Murray and Richard Herrnstein was published in 1994, I was a junior in college and didn’t know anything about the book except that it had my white literature professors in an uproar. A few of them inveighed against the book’s premise -- the very notion of intelligence as something people possess in varying degrees -- and then the whole controversy eventually died out.