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[OP-ED]: Both Trump and the media love wrestling in the mud

 08/21/2017 - 12:19
There’s no evidence behind the terrible accusation that Trump is in league with white supremacists. When he declared in his Monday remarks from the White House that “racism is evil,” I bought it. EFE

In keeping with the recent meme of recognizing bad behavior “on many sides,” there was something that was painfully obvious during last week’s improv news-conference-like-no-other in the lobby of Trump Tower: President Trump and the media deserve each other. Both are driven by ego and take criticism personally. Both will twist the facts to defend themselves and push their agenda. And both love to wrestle in the mud.

Rock and Roll and Resistance: A Conversation with Alejandro Escovedo

 08/11/2017 - 12:25
Alejandro Escovedo for Burn Something Beautiful by Nancy Rankin Escovedo 

Mexican-American musician and activist Alejandro Escovedo elucidates on his immigrant roots, his take on the government, his brush with death, and how the stories he feels compelled to compose transcend the genre of rock and roll. Escovedo will be strumming alongside Texan legend Joe Ely at Ardmore Music Hall on August 19th, 2017.

[OP-ED]: Donald Trump’s lost opportunity

 07/26/2017 - 09:12
Donald Trump could have quickly begun reshaping American politics. He heard voices that others didn’t, understood what those people wanted to hear and articulated much of it. But when it came time to deliver, it turned out that he had no serious ideas, policies, nor even the desire to search for them. EFE

There are many ways to evaluate the Trump presidency at the six-month mark. What I am struck by is the path not taken, the lost opportunity. Donald Trump had many flaws, but during the campaign, he tapped into a real set of problems facing America and a deep frustration with the existing political system. Additionally, he embraced and expressed -- somewhat inconsistently -- a populism that went beyond the traditional left-right divide. What would things look like at this point if President Trump had governed in the manner of a pragmatic, jobs-oriented reformer who was relentlessly focused on the “forgotten” Americans of whom he often speaks?

Próxima Parada: Innovación

 07/05/2017 - 14:12
SEPTA isn't stopping with the SEPTA Key, new changes to the system are coming as early as July.

Coherente con su misión desde los inicios de su carrera dentro de la compañía y con un gran conocimiento de la estructura básica y el funcionamiento de ésta, el director general de SEPTA, Jeffrey D. Knueppel, habló en exclusiva con AL DIA sobre la transformación de la empresa de transporte público de Filadelfia de cara a los retos del siglo XXI.

[OP-ED]: How can we lift the tension between law enforcement and motorists of color?

 06/28/2017 - 11:44
Even at the pivotal moment Castile very straightforwardly tells Yanez, “Sir, I do have to tell you, I have a firearm on me.” Yanez calmly says, “Don’t reach for it, then. Don’t pull it out.”  CNN.com Dashcam video

 My brother-in-law, a volunteer constable in a small Arkansas town, once said that the answer to the tensions and violence between motorists of color and the police was for law enforcement to treat those they are sworn to protect with respect and politeness.

[OP-ED]: Trump stumbles into another decade of war in the Middle East

 06/27/2017 - 09:39
During the campaign, Trump seemed to be genuinely reflective about America’s role in the Middle East. “This is not usually me talking, OK, ‘cause I’m very proactive,” he once said on the subject. EFE

While we have been focused on the results of special elections, the ups and downs of the Russia investigation, and President Trump’s latest tweets, under the radar, a broad and consequential shift in American foreign policy appears to be underway. Put simply, the United States is stumbling its way into another decade of war in the greater Middle East. And this next decade of conflict might prove to be even more destabilizing than the last one.

[OP-ED]: By all means, take issue with ‘The Bell Curve.’ But read it first

 06/23/2017 - 08:47
t’s a shame that the controversy regarding “The Bell Curve” centered on the book’s delineation of the differences in measured intelligence between blacks and whites

When “The Bell Curve” by Charles A. Murray and Richard Herrnstein was published in 1994, I was a junior in college and didn’t know anything about the book except that it had my white literature professors in an uproar. A few of them inveighed against the book’s premise -- the very notion of intelligence as something people possess in varying degrees -- and then the whole controversy eventually died out.

[OP-ED]: Rather than heading to the silver screen, take a moment this summer to look inward

 06/16/2017 - 12:30
Try Michael Sandel’s “Justice: What’s the Right Thing To Do?,” which covers a wide range of thought provoking questions about civic life and describes the philosophical foundations for competing impulses. (The wonderful 12-hour Harvard lecture series is available to view on YouTube, as well.)

 Last week, I packed my husband and two sons off to enjoy their much-anticipated viewing of the new superhero movie “Wonder Woman.”

I used to partake in such outings to the summer action blockbuster, but by the time “Wonder Woman” came out, I was already sick and tired of being browbeaten by countless feminine-power “hot takes” and “think pieces,” plus the inevitable reports of outrage.