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[OP-ED]: Publishers shouldn’t confine Latino authors to just ‘immigrant stories’

 08/15/2017 - 11:41
According to Pew, 68 percent of all Hispanics speak English proficiently. And, in 2013, the center noted that they tipped over into preferring English-language news, signaling that there may be some mismatch between what Latino readers say they want and what they will actually consume. 

 A day or so after Sonia Sotomayor’s biography, “My Beloved World” was released, I got a call from a New York Times reporter asking me how well the book would sell. She jumped in to the first question: “Why don’t Latinos read?”

Open Your Eyes: A South Philly Gallery Celebrates Latin American Art for Nearly 50 Years

 08/04/2017 - 15:53
One of the many multihued and adorned walls of Eye's Gallery. Photographed by Mónica Marie Zorrilla. 

If the cliché rings true and the eyes really are the window to the soul, then "Eye's Gallery" on 402 South Street has been the enchanting window to Latin American, Moroccan, and Indian folklore since 1968. The love child of Julia and her husband, the renowned "Magic Gardens" creator Isaiah, the gallery's origins are wondrous like its contents. 

[OP-ED]: Mad at everyone

 07/03/2017 - 17:41
Not surprisingly, the system has become self-perpetuating. It feeds on mutual recriminations. On this July 4, the Founders -- who had deep disagreements, but compromised -- would doubtlessly disapprove.

This is the summer of our discontent. As Americans celebrate July 4, they are mad at their leaders, mad at their government and mad at each other. A recent Pew poll finds that “public trust in government remains near historic lows.” Just 20 percent of Americans trust the government to “do the right thing just about always or most of the time.” The comparable figures were 40 percent in 2000 and almost 80 percent in the early 1960s. There has been a long-term loss of trust.

[OP-ED]: Despite how the Census Bureau now treats it, ‘Hispanic/Latino’ is not a race

 03/16/2017 - 09:26
hispanics, race, census

The U.S. Census Bureau has been experimenting with alternate versions of the race and ethnicity section of its National Content Test Research Study. The bureau hopes that by the next census in 2020, it can more accurately tally Hispanics and other newly prominent minority groups.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda