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Populism

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Senator Jeff Flake's Speech is the Most Important Political Manifest of the Moment

Arizona Republican Senator Jeff Flake's retirement speech has been not only unique in its kind, but has become the most important in Senate history, and definitely the most important this year so far.

[OP-ED]: Amid Trump’s chaos, a post-American world emerges

 08/01/2017 - 09:10
In 2008, I wrote a book about the emerging “Post-American World,” which was, I noted at the start, not about the decline of America but rather the rise of the rest. Amid the parochialism, ineptitude and sheer disarray of the Trump presidency, the post-American world is coming to fruition much faster than I ever expected.

 In London last week, I met a Nigerian man who succinctly expressed the reaction of much of the world to America these days. “Your country has gone crazy,” he said, with a mixture of outrage and amusement. “I’m from Africa. I know crazy, but I didn’t ever think I would see this in America!”

OP-ED]: Trump is hurting America’s friends abroad

 05/10/2017 - 09:26
t is now quite possible -- in fact, likely -- that the next president of Mexico will be an anti-American socialist-populist similar to Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez. Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador was polling around 10 percent at the start of 2015. He is now around 30 percent, the front-runner among the potential candidates for next year’s election. File

There has been much focus on Donald Trump’s erratic foreign policy -- the outlandish positions, the many flip-flops, the mistakes. But far more damaging in the long run might be what some have termed the Trump effect -- the impact of Trump on the domestic politics of other countries. That effect appears to be powerful, negative and enduring. It could undermine decades of American foreign policy successes.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

Face to Face: French Voters Choose Centrist and Far-Right Candidates for Presidency

 04/24/2017 - 02:17
French presidential election candidate for the 'En Marche!' (Onwards!) political movement, Emmanuel Macron celebrates after the first round of the French presidential elections in Paris, France, 23 April 2017. EPA/YOAN VALAT

Emmanuel Macron (Center) and Marine Le Pen (far right) advanced to the runoff in France’s presidential elections on May 7. After the UK’s vote to leave the European Union and the US vote for the political novice Donald Trump as president, the French presidential race is the latest election to shake up establishment politics by kicking out the figures that stood for the status quo. 

Author: 

[OP-ED]: The Return of the center

 02/28/2017 - 15:33

Polls indicate that the far-right candidate, Marine Le Pen, is leading the field of candidates in the first round with about 25 percent of the vote. But in the second round, which pits only the two front-runners against one another, Macron is projected to beat her handily. EFE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

By now it is settled wisdom that we are witnessing the rise of radical forces on the left and right around the globe. Populists of both varieties, who share a disdain for globalization, are energized, and certain that the future is going their way. But the center is rising again, even in the heart of the old world.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

Latin America against the 2017 Hurricane

 01/03/2017 - 04:22
Voters across Latin America  – like those in Colombia who turned against a peace deal, those in the UK who opted for Brexit, and those in the US who cast ballots for Trump – were evidently jaded and ready for change, however uncertain, reports The Guardian. Photo: EFE/RICARDO MALDONADO ROZO

The past 12 to 14 months have been a disaster for the Latin American left. The Guardian reports on how after dominating the region for the previous decade, the socialist left has receded and with it has gone much of the progressive idealism that led to poverty reduction, improved access to healthcare and education, and greater rights for indigenous groups.

Déjà Vu

 11/20/2016 - 16:41
Venezuela president, Nicolás Maduro, a populist, said on Sunday that president Obama was a "despicable" person for talking nonsense against Venezuela. EFE/Palacio de Miraflores

Latinos in the US do not need to be told about the dangers of Populism and its aftermaths. Many of them have experienced it first hand in their countries of origin: Hugo Chávez in Venezuela –after his death, the country is in crisis–, Cristina Fernández in Argentina – now facing corruption charges –, or Rafael Correa in Ecuador. So why is Populism now on the rise in the US and Europe? Growing inequality of incomes is one possible answer to understand why populism is on retreat in Latin America and growing in the West.