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Barcelona attack: Ripoll, the Pyrenees town that spawned a terrorist cell

 08/21/2017 - 08:07
Varias mujeres familiares de los jóvenes de Ripoll (Girona) presuntos autores de los atentados de Barcelona y Cambrils (Tarragona), durante la concentración que ha realizado la comunidad musulmana esta tarde en la plaza del Ayuntamiento para expresar, "rotos" de dolor, el rechazo a lo ocurrido y guardar un minuto de silencio por las víctimas. EFE/Robin Townsend

 The Spanish authorities said that the attacks that killed at least 14 people in Barcelona and Cambrils appeared to be part of a terrorist cell’s extensive plot led by the imam of a the small mountain town of Ripoll. He may have died a day before the attacks when explosives that the group was manufacturing accidentally detonated.

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Sessions calls for punishing, not protecting, criminals in sanctuary cities

 08/17/2017 - 05:09
A group of people protest against the immigration policies of President Donald Trump during the visit of Attorney General Jeff Sessions to Miami on Aug. 16, 2017. Sessions urged the local authorities to follow the example set by Miami-Dade County of "punishing, not protecting" criminals during a speech in which he criticized Chicago's policies. EFE/Giorgio Viera

In Miami, Sessions lambasted so-called "sanctuary cities" - municipalities and other local entities that refuse to cooperate with voluntary immigration programs and including Chicago and San Francisco - and he blamed them for crimes committed by undocumented immigrants.

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EFE

37 die in clash between inmates, police at Venezuelan prison

 08/17/2017 - 04:56
Venezuelan authorities guard the Jose Gregorio Hernandez Hospital after an interior ministry team tried to take the prison by force that in Puerto Ayacucho, Venezuela, 16 August 2017. EPA/Pedro Zapata

 As part of an effort to curb prison violence, the leftist government has imposed a militarized administration in roughly half of Venezuela's penal institutions. US Vice President Mike Pence said Monday in Cartagena, Colombia, that Venezuela is a failed state that threatens the security and prosperity of the entire hemisphere.

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EFE

[OP-ED]: El gran debate de Trump sobre el crecimiento económico

 08/15/2017 - 10:01
No hay suficiente dinero para satisfacer todas nuestras demandas, incluso a tasas más altas de crecimiento económico. Habrá conflictos entre gastos privados y gubernamentales; entre gastos nacionales y locales; entre gastos de salud y gastos de no-salud; y entre gastos dedicados a los ancianos versus los jóvenes. El presente es polémico; el futuro quizás sea peor.

La discusión entre el gobierno de Trump y sus críticos sobre una tasa de crecimiento económico sostenible suscita profundas preguntas sobre el futuro de Estados Unidos. ¿Ingresamos en un período prolongado de crecimiento económico lento? Si es así, ¿cómo altera eso la sociedad y la política? ¿O acaso las medidas “correctas” elevarán el crecimiento económico a niveles del pasado?

[OP-ED]: Trump’s great growth debate

 08/09/2017 - 08:58
There isn’t enough money to satisfy all our demands, even at higher rates of economic growth. There will be conflicts between private and governmental spending; between national and local spending; between health spending and non-health spending; and between spending on the old versus the young. The present is contentious; the future may be worse.

The argument between the Trump administration and its critics over a sustainable rate of economic growth raises profound questions about America’s future. Have we entered a prolonged period of slow growth? If so, how does that alter society and politics? Or will the “right” policies raise growth to past levels? 

If you haven’t paid attention, here’s a brief overview of the debate.

[OP-ED]: The Democrats should rethink immigration absolutism

 08/08/2017 - 08:09
Republican senators from North Carolina Thom Tillis, Wyoming John Barrsso (left) and Texas John Cornyn give a press conference to present the Republican legislative proposal to increase border security and tightening of immigration laws on Capitol Hill, Washington DC (United States). EFE

In 1992, the Democratic Party faced a challenge on the issue of abortion. Pennsylvania’s governor, Robert Casey, a Democrat dedicated to the working class, asked to speak at the national convention in New York City. He wanted to propose a pro-life plank for the party platform, mostly as a way of affirming his Catholic beliefs.

[OP-ED]: Trump is but the latest politician to serenade Youngstown

 08/04/2017 - 08:03
It’s no surprise that Trump returned to the familiar theme of demonizing Latino immigrants. The surprise is that he chose to do it in Youngstown of all places -- a city with a minuscule immigrant population, located in a state where the Latino population is just 3.7 percent. EFE

Youngstown again? As an avid spectator of politics, I’ve been hearing about that city in the Mahoning Valley of northeast Ohio for decades. Although it’s home to just 64,000 people, Youngstown gets more than its share of attention from politicians, media, filmmakers, and even a poetic singer/songwriter from Freehold, New Jersey.

[OP-ED]: Can we die in peace?

 07/28/2017 - 08:38
Just whether the persistence of high-cost care reflects good medicine, a deep human craving to cling to life, or both is unclear. But the rhetoric about “end-of-life” care has changed more than the reality. To the question -- Can we die in peace and with dignity? -- the answer is “not yet.”

For those of us who had hoped that American attitudes toward death were shifting in ways that would promote a wider reconstruction of the health care system, there’s discouraging news from Health Affairs, the pre-eminent journal of health policy. It devotes its latest issue to “end-of-life” care and finds that -- at least so far -- the power to make health care more compassionate and cost-effective is limited.

[OP-ED]: Deficits forever?

 07/20/2017 - 12:15
The federal budget remains badly out of whack, even though we are near or at “full employment” (June unemployment rate: 4.4 percent). We cannot afford tax cuts; we need tax increases.

House Republicans, who are now deliberating the government’s 2018 budget, pledge to eliminate deficits within a decade. Well, good luck with that. It must be obvious that chronic deficits reflect a basic political impasse that can be broken only if majorities in Congress do things they’ve refused to do: trim Social Security benefits; raise taxes significantly; control health spending. There is a giant mismatch between what Americans want from government and what they’ll pay for with taxes.

[OP-ED]: Why robots won’t steal all our jobs

 07/14/2017 - 08:43
En un mundo ideal, los robots realizarían la mayoría de los trabajos repetitivos y monótonos, mientras que la fuerza de trabajo mejor educada y mejor paga se concentraría en trabajos que no pueden ser realizados por máquinas. Archivo

Don’t worry, the robots won’t destroy all our jobs. History suggests just the opposite -- that new technologies inspire new jobs. So concludes a study from leading labor economists. It’s a useful antidote to widespread fears that robots and “artificial intelligence” will displace millions of workers and lead to permanently high joblessness.

[OP-ED]: America & me: A love story

 07/06/2017 - 14:05
A group of deported veterans protested in honor of deported veterans who have died outside the United States, and demanded changes to laws that would give veterans deported access to medical benefits. EFE

At the risk of setting off more fireworks, I’ve spent the days surrounding the Fourth of July trying to answer a question that has perplexed U.S. Latinos for generations. Whether the yardstick is starting businesses, creating jobs, spreading opportunity, serving in uniform or displaying optimism in hard times, America’s largest minority has shown time and again that we love this country. 

But does the country love us back?