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Mexico-US border counts deadly toll- "His body was handed over to us in pieces"

 06/13/2017 - 05:13
United States Border Patrol (USBP) agents stand beside a raft, reportedly used by people to cross the river, under the bridge along the Rio Grande River near Rio Grande City, Texas, USA, 01 March 2017. EPA/LARRY W. SMITH

In the context of expansion of organized crime in Mexico, migrants have become easy targets, as they are more visible, easily identifiable as migrants and, in many cases, they walk on a predetermined route. At least 400 immigrants were killed on their way from Central America to the US in 2015.  

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: The perils of assuming anything about the Latino vote

 05/18/2017 - 08:20
You don’t need to be a political scientist to figure out a few simple truths: In raw numbers, more and more Hispanics will cast ballots in upcoming elections -- as has been the case for the past 36 years.

At the outset of their new book, “Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign,” Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes note that adviser David Plouffe prioritized three goals for Clinton to win: “It was important to have the right culture and mission, to manage Bill Clinton, and to effectively target Latino voters.”

We know how well that turned out.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Is your phone eavesdropping on your conversation about cannibalism? Mine may have.

 03/08/2017 - 18:41

Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you were to read biology professor Bill Schutt’s new book “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” you’d have lots to talk about at the dinner table.

There are, for instance, sections on how cannibalism is portrayed in popular culture, news stories and historical texts. Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: ¿Escucha a escondidas su teléfono sus conversaciones sobre el canibalismo? El mío tal vez lo hizo.

 03/08/2017 - 18:15
Schutt investiga—con humor negro—la manera en que funciona el canibalismo en las diversas especies animales y cómo lo comprenden los humanos de diferentes naciones, culturas y religiones. De alguna manera, hace que el tema sea fascinante en lugar de truculento.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Si usted lee el nuevo libro del profesor de biología, Bill Schutt, titulado “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” tendrá mucho de qué hablar durante la cena.

Hay, por ejemplo, secciones sobre la forma en que se pinta el canibalismo en la cultura popular, en los artículos periodísticos y en los textos de historia. Schutt investiga—con humor negro—la manera en que funciona el canibalismo en las diversas especies animales y cómo lo comprenden los humanos de diferentes naciones, culturas y religiones. De alguna manera, hace que el tema sea fascinante en lugar de truculento.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

Closing the digital divide one government app at a time

 08/19/2010 - 11:48
Closing the digital divide one government app at a time

Welcome to the brave new world of social (media) government -- a world where you can use mobile phone apps to get information from Uncle Sam so you don't actually have to talk to him.

On July 2, the White House relaunched its usa.gov website and rolled out 20 sleek new multiplatform apps that allow phones to perform wonders such as reading bar-codes and searching the database of Consumer Product Safety Commission recalls, and getting up-to-the minute travel advisories from the Transportation Security Administration.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda