parents

[OP-ED]: The bumpy road to adulthood

 04/27/2017 - 14:43
The Great Recession’s high unemployment surely drove many young people back to their parents. The actual number of 18- to 34-year-olds living at home totaled 24 million in 2015. Two-thirds say they’re happy with their home life. The fact that more Americans go to college and graduate school than in the past has also delayed marriage, living independently and having children.
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Growing up isn’t what it used to be. There’s a yawning gap between the end of adolescence and the beginning of adulthood: a period when millions of 20-somethings and 30-somethings have many adult freedoms without all the responsibilities. Social scientists have tried -- so far in vain -- to name this new life-stage, but no one should question its significance.

Posted Date: 
Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 10:00am
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Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson
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The Great Recession’s high unemployment surely drove many young people back to their parents. The actual number of 18- to 34-year-olds living at home totaled 24 million in 2015. Two-thirds say they’re happy with their home life. The fact that more Americans go to college and graduate school than in the past has also delayed marriage, living independently and having children.

[OP-ED]: Am I Latino Enough?

 04/26/2017 - 13:45
The Puerto Rican identity in America, ingrained but lost amongst younger generations.
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How has the assimilation of first generation immigrants impacted their children and grandchildren? Younger Latinos are now faced with the task of finding themselves between their American and Native culture identities. 

Posted Date: 
Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 12:30pm
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The Puerto Rican identity in America, ingrained but lost amongst younger generations.

[OP-ED]: America the complacent

 04/26/2017 - 10:54
In his new book, “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream,” Cowen argues that we’ve overcorrected and gone too far toward trying to create perfect, insulated “bubble worlds” for ourselves and our kids. And now we’re afraid to change anything, lest we burst the bubble. 
English

The headline grabbed my attention: “Americans have become lazy and it’s hurting the economy.” 

Lazy? Now there’s a four-letter word you rarely hear Americans use to describe themselves.

Posted Date: 
Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 10:45am
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In his new book, “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream,” Cowen argues that we’ve overcorrected and gone too far toward trying to create perfect, insulated “bubble worlds” for ourselves and our kids. And now we’re afraid to change anything, lest we burst the bubble. 

A Guatemalan indigenous land rights activist wins the Goldman Environmental Prize

 04/25/2017 - 03:26
Guatemalan indigenous leader Rodrigo Tot poses during an interview with EFE in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Apr. 24, 2017. EFE/Esteban Biba

Rodrigo Tot, born in central Guatemala during the mining boom of the 1960s, spent much of his 59 years in a tenacious battle against the mining industry in the Lake Izabal region.

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Posted Date: 
Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 3:15am
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EFE
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Guatemalan indigenous leader Rodrigo Tot poses during an interview with EFE in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Apr. 24, 2017. EFE/Esteban Biba

US to prosecute parents who pay "coyotes" to ferry kids over border

 04/21/2017 - 03:50
US Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks next to US Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly during a press conference in El Paso, Texas, United States, Apr. 20, 2017. EFE/Luis Pablo Hernandez
English

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly and Attorney General Jeff Sessions promised Thursday to prosecute parents who pay people-traffickers to help their children illegally cross the border into the US from Mexico and confirmed that the White House is still committed to build a wall along the two countries

Posted Date: 
Friday, April 21, 2017 - 3:45am
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EFE
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US Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks next to US Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly during a press conference in El Paso, Texas, United States, Apr. 20, 2017. EFE/Luis Pablo Hernandez

[OP-ED]: Book focuses on why we need power -- and how to get it

 04/18/2017 - 08:30
Liu’s latest act of courage and belief is that he has written an important book on a topic -- power -- that Americans need to understand better. He has a message for us. And we’d be wise to listen.
English

At America’s core, you’ll find two competing beliefs about citizen power. On the one hand, Americans cherish the idea that one person can create social change. But there is also the sense that -- to quote Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders -- the game is rigged.

Posted Date: 
Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 8:30am
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Liu’s latest act of courage and belief is that he has written an important book on a topic -- power -- that Americans need to understand better. He has a message for us. And we’d be wise to listen.

Hundreds gather at White House to protest Trump's immigration policies

 04/14/2017 - 03:12
Under the slogan "We belong together," families from Miami, New York, Colorado and the Washington DC area gathered at Lafayette Park, in front of the presidential mansion, to "raise the community's awareness that we should be united." EFE/Shawn Thew
English

About 200 people – including a number of small children – gathered before the White House on April 13, 2017, to protest the immigration policies of President Donald Trump and denounce the family separation created by the massive deportations undertaken by the magnate.

Posted Date: 
Friday, April 14, 2017 - 3:00am
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EFE
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Under the slogan "We belong together," families from Miami, New York, Colorado and the Washington DC area gathered at Lafayette Park, in front of the presidential mansion, to "raise the community's awareness that we should be united." EFE/Shawn Thew

[OP-ED]: Nueva York garantiza asistencia legal gratuita a todos sus inmigrantes

 04/12/2017 - 07:48
In a groundbreaking decision, New York state’s 2017-2018 budget earmarks $10 million to provide free legal assistance to immigrants, $4 million of which have specifically been assigned to provide lawyers to all immigrants at risk of deportation by expanding the Vera Institute of Justice’s New York Immigrant Family Unity Project (NYIFUP).
Spanish

La política extremista antiinmigrante de la administración Trump ha sembrado el terror en las comunidades inmigrantes de todo el país. Pero Nueva York, fiel a su reputación como el estado inmigrante por excelencia, pronto se convertirá en el primero en toda la nación en darles a todos los inmigrantes pobres que enfrentan deportación, una oportunidad efectiva de defenderse.

Posted Date: 
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 3:15pm
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En una decisión sin precedentes, el presupuesto para 2018 del estado de Nueva York destina $10 millones a proveer asistencia legal gratuita a inmigrantes, de los que $4 millones se asignan específicamente para suministrar abogados a todos los inmigrantes en peligro de ser deportados mediante la expansión del Proyecto para la Unidad de las Familias Inmigrantes de Nueva York (NYIFUP) del Instituto Vera para la Justicia. EFE

[OP-ED]: New York’s Pioneering Initiative Gives Immigrants a Fighting Chance

 04/11/2017 - 15:17
In a groundbreaking decision, New York state’s 2017-2018 budget earmarks $10 million to provide free legal assistance to immigrants, $4 million of which have specifically been assigned to provide lawyers to all immigrants at risk of deportation by expanding the Vera Institute of Justice’s New York Immigrant Family Unity Project (NYIFUP).
English

The Trump administration’s extreme anti-immigration policies have terrorized immigrant communities all over the country, but New York, living up to its reputation as the quintessential immigrant state, is becoming the first in the nation to provide a fighting chance to all poor immigrants facing deportation.

Posted Date: 
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 3:15pm
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In a groundbreaking decision, New York state’s 2017-2018 budget earmarks $10 million to provide free legal assistance to immigrants, $4 million of which have specifically been assigned to provide lawyers to all immigrants at risk of deportation by expanding the Vera Institute of Justice’s New York Immigrant Family Unity Project (NYIFUP).

The one-year anniversary of Philadelphia’s bilingual program, Atrévete

 04/10/2017 - 15:16
The Atrévete team includes people from different backgrounds, Latin America and the United States. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick / AL DÍA News.

An audiovisual project of the PhillyCam NGO became an exercise in social fabric that gives voice to the Spanish-speaking communities of Philadelphia.

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Posted Date: 
Sunday, April 9, 2017 - 8:15pm
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Plain Text Author: 
Edwin López Moya
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The Atrévete team includes people from different backgrounds, Latin America and the United States. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick / AL DÍA News.

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