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Rock and Roll and Resistance: A Conversation with Alejandro Escovedo

 08/11/2017 - 12:25
Alejandro Escovedo for Burn Something Beautiful by Nancy Rankin Escovedo 

Mexican-American musician and activist Alejandro Escovedo elucidates on his immigrant roots, his take on the government, his brush with death, and how the stories he feels compelled to compose transcend the genre of rock and roll. Escovedo will be strumming alongside Texan legend Joe Ely at Ardmore Music Hall on August 19th, 2017.

Muere el filósofo y poeta Ramon Xirau, voz del exilio español en Mexico

 07/28/2017 - 06:18
Spanish-born philosopher and poet Ramon Xirau is seen at his Mexico City home in a photo taken Jan. 20, 2014. EFE/Mario Guzman/File

El poeta llegó a México con sus padres cuando tenía 15 años, tras la caída del ejército republicano en la guerra civil española. Considerado uno de los máximos exponentes de la poesía y el pensamiento mexicanos, Xirau fue, según su amigo Octavio Paz, "un puente entre América y Europa."  

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Could a Mathematical Formula stop the extinction of species?

 07/26/2017 - 07:11
Hugh Possingham, chief scientist of the NGO The Nature Conservancy, who presented in Colombia this week a controversial mathematical formula that measures the cost-benefit of saving different species, in order to decide which should be given priority. EFE/NGO The Nature Conservancy

Math has already been used effectively in defining protected areas in places with productive activities in 150 countries over the past 15 years. The best example of that application is Australia's Great Barrier Reef, where a software called Marxan permitted the expansion of protected areas from 5 percent to 35 percent while preserving species and improving fishing. 

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EFE

[OP-ED]: On North Korea, hope is not a strategy

 07/11/2017 - 15:46
Kim Jong Un is a young man but has been highly effective at preserving his authority. He has secured the support of the military and sidelined or killed anyone who threatened his grip on power -- including his uncle and, allegedly, his half-brother. EFE

In Washington, there is a conventional wisdom on North Korea that spans both parties and much of elite opinion. It goes roughly like this: North Korea is the world’s most bizarre country, run by a crackpot dictator with a strange haircut. He is unpredictable and irrational and cannot be negotiated with. Eventually this weird and cruel regime will collapse. Meanwhile, the only solution is more and more pressure. But what if the conventional wisdom is wrong?