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In Search of the Maya World: From Central America to Philadelphia

 06/27/2017 - 14:26
Gallery of archaeological pieces of Mayan culture exhibited at the Museum of Archeology and Anthropology of the University of Pennsylvania. Photo: Supplied UPEnn

One of the most intriguing mysteries of Latin American culture is what happened to the Maya civilization. How come after over 3,000 years of history, from about 2, 500 BC to 950 AD, most of the glorious Maya centers in Mesoamerica were abandoned? Before the arrival of the Europeans in the 1500’s magnificent cities like Tikal in Guatemala and Copán in Honduras had all but disappeared; left uninhabited, they were covered by thick jungle growth, hidden throughout the mountains and the lowlands. 

Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 1:15pm
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No papers, no scholarship: Latino budding scientist becomes food truck chef

 06/20/2017 - 06:39
Dreamer Lorenzo Santillan in Phoenix, Arizona, United States. EFE/Beatriz Limon

After winning a prestigious robotics contest, Dreamer Lorenzo Santillan had the chance to become a scientist, but his immigration status kept him from getting a university scholarship and he had to find an alternative, which turned out to be a traveling food truck that he calls "Neither Here Nor There."

Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 6:30am
Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: Rather than heading to the silver screen, take a moment this summer to look inward

 06/16/2017 - 12:30
Try Michael Sandel’s “Justice: What’s the Right Thing To Do?,” which covers a wide range of thought provoking questions about civic life and describes the philosophical foundations for competing impulses. (The wonderful 12-hour Harvard lecture series is available to view on YouTube, as well.)

 Last week, I packed my husband and two sons off to enjoy their much-anticipated viewing of the new superhero movie “Wonder Woman.”

I used to partake in such outings to the summer action blockbuster, but by the time “Wonder Woman” came out, I was already sick and tired of being browbeaten by countless feminine-power “hot takes” and “think pieces,” plus the inevitable reports of outrage.

Friday, June 16, 2017 - 12:15pm

Mexican duo goes from undocumented immigrants to US music idols

 06/13/2017 - 06:13
Gabriel (L) and Martiniano Berrelleza (R), members of Los Cuates de Sinaloa, during an interview with EFE in Phoenix, Arizona, United States on June 9, 2017. EFE/Beatriz Limon

After leaving their native state of Sinaloa, Mexico, 20 years ago to head north across the border, the cousins Gabriel and Nano Berrelleza founded Los Cuates de Sinaloa, a Mexican "corrido" band that became one of the most popular of its kind on both sides of the border.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 6:00am
Plain Text Author: 
EFE

World leaders as caricatures: the curious case of Winston Churchill

 06/12/2017 - 08:13
Brian Cox as Winston Churchill in the film directed by Jonathan Teplitzky. Photo: Cohen Media Group.

It might not be a great movie – it most certainly is not –, but “Churchill” raises a question – perhaps the question – that every American citizen should be asking himself at this point in time: what does it mean to be “great”?

Monday, June 12, 2017 - 8:00am
Plain Text Author: 
David Franco

Salma Hayek on Trump: "I ask myself whether it's stupidity, malignity or greed"

 06/06/2017 - 03:45
Salma Hayek (d) y Connie Britton (i) en la película "Beatriz at Dinner", una comedia inteligente y ácida donde la mexicana encarna el papel de una sanadora de medicina alternativa, inmigrante, que choca con la soberbia y prepotencia de un magnate del mundo de los bienes raíces. EFE/Roadside Attractions

Together with Puerto Rican director Miguel Arteta, Hayek presented the Miami media with her latest film, "Beatriz at Dinner," a smart, tart comedy in which the Mexican plays the part of an immigrant alternative-medicine healer who comes up against the arrogance and self-importance of a real-estate magnate.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 3:30am
Plain Text Author: 
EFE