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Supporters of far-right presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro show support in front of his condominium of Barra de Tijuca, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Oct 28, 2018. EPA-EFE/Antonio Lacerda
EFE

Several international organizations spoke about the new president-elect, who is known for his sexist, homophobic, and racist comments.

[OP-ED]: ¿Harán ahora perfiles étnicos de los blancos, como lo hacen del resto de nosotros?

 08/21/2017 - 11:06
Un contra-manifestante grita a los policías antidisturbios tras los rumores de una marcha planeada por el KKK y otros grupos de supremacía blanca, en Durham, Carolina del Norte, Estados Unidos. EFE

Si es cierto, como algunos afirman, que por el aumento en la estridencia de los supremacistas blancos es aceptable mostrar prejuicios raciales, entonces los blancos comenzarán a sentir el dolor de ser asociados con un pequeño grupo radical de racistas extremos.

[OP-ED]: Does ‘executive function’ play a role in how likely police officers are to use deadly force?

 07/13/2017 - 11:13
Study of the Philadelphia police was unique because of its access to such a deep trove of information on officers, as most departments do not make such data available. File

The concept of “executive function” was popularized by social science research showing that young children who can control their impulses, pay attention, remember details, manage their time and plan are more likely to be successful in school.

[OP-ED]: America’s postindustrial blues

 06/22/2017 - 09:43
Says Richard Reeves of the Brookings Institution in his new book “Dream Hoarders.” We should not be surprised that 58 percent of whites and 67 percent of whites without a college degree voted for Trump.

Ever since Donald Trump’s election, a cottage industry of politicians, journalists, scholars and commentators has sought to understand what motivates Trump supporters. Theories have ranged from globalization to a rebellion against Washington elitism to racism. But the true cause may have been overlooked: the “postindustrial society.”

[OP-ED]: The perils of assuming anything about the Latino vote

 05/18/2017 - 08:20
You don’t need to be a political scientist to figure out a few simple truths: In raw numbers, more and more Hispanics will cast ballots in upcoming elections -- as has been the case for the past 36 years.

At the outset of their new book, “Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign,” Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes note that adviser David Plouffe prioritized three goals for Clinton to win: “It was important to have the right culture and mission, to manage Bill Clinton, and to effectively target Latino voters.”

We know how well that turned out.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Those in the ‘resistance’ should refrain from mocking Trump’s supporters

 05/16/2017 - 15:29
According to an analysis of post-election survey data conducted by the Public Religion Research Institute and The Atlantic, financially troubled voters in the white working class were more likely to prefer Hillary Clinton over Trump.

Though it’s generally a happy home, there is a stark cultural divide in my house: My husband, who was raised in a tiny, Southern rural town that was almost 100 percent white, loves “The Andy Griffith Show.”

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Is the American dream on a ‘self-defeating quest’?

 04/04/2017 - 15:06
 La mayor parte del nuevo libro del economista Tyler Cowen, titulado “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream”, es una lectura mega-deprimente.

Inequality is rising. Segregation by socioeconomic class, educational attainment and race is skyrocketing. The country is generally less dynamic and more risk-averse -- when people have the opportunity to move for a better quality of life or more rewarding job, they tend to settle for staying put.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Racism and the Trump effect at the high school where I teach

 02/28/2017 - 15:06
A small group of Mexicans and Americans demonstrated today in two parts of the Mexican capital for the visit to the country by US Secretaries of State, Rex Tillerson, and Interior Security, John Kelly, where they declared through banners "Persona non grata" to the secretaries, an official visit in Mexico, and urged them to stop the hatred, racism and ignorance shown so far by the policies of President Donald Trump. EFE

My two sons used to come home from a day at high school complaining that ludicrous accusations of racism were as common as the desks in the classrooms. I chalked it up to adolescent exaggeration.

After having spent the current academic year as a teacher surrounded by rowdy high-schoolers, I can attest that they were right.

In the hallways, at assemblies, in my classroom, “That’s racist!” was a common refrain for most of the early fall.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: When straight talk is crazy talk

 02/02/2017 - 08:35
Drastic actions -- like the temporary ban on arrivals from certain predominantly Muslim countries -- bring with them the potential for backlash that is greater than the affections of those who are pleased with them. On Saturday, when even green card holders were stuck in airports, unable to re-enter the country after having traveled overseas on business, study or vacation, the results were messy and angry. EFE

What are we to make of a man who seems unable to keep himself from making false statements, yet fundamentally keeps his word?

Donald Trump as president is something that we’ve rarely seen before: A self-styled straight-talker who didn’t disappoint his most fervent supporters by tacking to the center after claiming victory.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Viewing minorities as monolithic groups only exacerbates inequality

 01/31/2017 - 15:29
People along with members of the Senate and the US House. Participate at a rally in opposition to the US President's immigration ban. Donald Trump, in front of the Supreme Court in Washington. EFE

“Disaggregation” is not a word that rolls off the tongue easily. But the concept of separating a whole into its distinct parts is one that we should embrace when it comes to statistics about minorities.

The time when it was sufficient to break out data by simple race or ethnicity segments has past. Demographics and new sociological and scientific understanding about the people that make up the broad categories of black, Asian and Hispanic tell us that these labels are becoming increasingly blunt instruments when we look at public health and education policy.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda