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Author David Grossman from Israel poses for photographs after being announced the winner of the 'Man Booker International Prize 2017' for his novel 'A Horse Walks Into A Bar' during a ceremony at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, Britain, 14 June 2017. EPA/WILL OLIVER
EFE

The 63-year-old author is known for his opposition to Israel's occupation of Palestinian territories and his support of the peace process. His son Uri was killed fighting in the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah conflict.

Muere el filósofo y poeta Ramon Xirau, voz del exilio español en Mexico

 07/28/2017 - 06:18
Spanish-born philosopher and poet Ramon Xirau is seen at his Mexico City home in a photo taken Jan. 20, 2014. EFE/Mario Guzman/File

El poeta llegó a México con sus padres cuando tenía 15 años, tras la caída del ejército republicano en la guerra civil española. Considerado uno de los máximos exponentes de la poesía y el pensamiento mexicanos, Xirau fue, según su amigo Octavio Paz, "un puente entre América y Europa."  

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[OP-ED]: By all means, take issue with ‘The Bell Curve.’ But read it first

 06/23/2017 - 08:47
t’s a shame that the controversy regarding “The Bell Curve” centered on the book’s delineation of the differences in measured intelligence between blacks and whites

When “The Bell Curve” by Charles A. Murray and Richard Herrnstein was published in 1994, I was a junior in college and didn’t know anything about the book except that it had my white literature professors in an uproar. A few of them inveighed against the book’s premise -- the very notion of intelligence as something people possess in varying degrees -- and then the whole controversy eventually died out.

[OP-ED]: Is the American Dream killing us?

 04/04/2017 - 10:31
One theory attributes the spike in “deaths of despair” to growing income inequality. There would be fewer suicides, drug overdoses and alcohol-related deaths if incomes were distributed more equally, the argument goes. People take out their frustrations and anger by resorting to self-destructive behavior.

It isn’t often that economics raises the most profound questions of human existence, but recent work of economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton (husband and wife, both of Princeton University) comes close. You may recall that a few years ago, Case and Deaton reported the startling finding that the death rates of non-Hispanic middle-aged whites had gotten worse — they were dying younger.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

Philly Grows Into Its Anarchist Shoe

 03/29/2017 - 09:18
Wooden Shoe es una librería que encierra una atmósfera distinta a la de otros establecimientos dedicados a la venta de libros, aquí el enfoque es colaborativo y político. La librería está ubicada en el 704 South Street.  Foto Archivo Particular.

Past a chalkboard that says, “Come inside to read a good book,” on one side and “Don’t be an asshole!” on the other, you come across a tattered SEPTA Union Strike poster from the early twentieth century, preserved underneath an equally withered-away lamination. A few cautious inches deep inside of this surreal time machine, a pillar manages to stand from the 1890s home of an anarchist feminist writer and speaker who lived near Drexel University.

Who wants to study Spanish in Philadelphia?

 03/28/2017 - 16:30
María Paredes Fernández, profesora de español en Penn University, fue nominada el año pasado como “mejor profesora de español de EEUU”, por la Asociación Americana de Profesores de Español y Portugués (AATSP). Foto: Peter Fitzpatrick

The Hispanic immigrant community has played a fundamental role in the growth of the city in the last decade. In the streets it is more and more common to hear conversations held in Spanish. However, it seems that this important trend is not reflected in universities. Why? A general crisis in the study of the humanities would be the answer. AL DÍA News spoke with professors from three of the most prominent universities in the city.

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[OP-ED]: What happens when you pay entrepreneurial teenagers $100,000 to not go to college?

 03/02/2017 - 15:06
Wall Street Journal reporter Alexandra Wolfe tells us how it all panned out for the first class of “Thiel Fellows” in her deliciously detailed book “Valley of the Gods: A Silicon Valley Story.”

In 2011, billionaire Peter Thiel made headlines when he announced that he would pay 20 teenagers $100,000 each to drop out or delay college and start businesses in biotechnology, finance, energy and education.

Thiel, the co-founder of PayPal, a venture capitalist and early investor in Facebook, wanted to underscore his belief that college costs too much, isn’t as intellectually rigorous as it once was, and leaves recent grads burdened with student loans that keep them from taking the entrepreneurial risks needed to spur the economy.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

10 Latina Warriors you should know

 02/28/2017 - 17:45
Latina activists. 

Suffragettes, protesters, speakers and leaders - from Ana Roqué Géigel de Duprey and Luisa Capetillo in the late 1800s to Mariposa Fernández and Monica Carrillo in our current times - since the beginning of the 20th century, women have had to fight for their place in society as equal individuals, in front of a oppressive masculine society and a convenient feminine one.

Plain Text Author: 
Jamila Johnson and Yamily Habib

Those years of the Latin American Boom in Barcelona

 11/08/2016 - 10:16

The statue of Columbus pointing to America is probably one of the most emblematic monuments of Barcelona. It is located at the end of the Ramblas, in front of the old port, from where today you can board Las Golondrinas, a popular touristic boat. In that same place, coming from the same direction to which the finger of Columbus is still pointing, the Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa landed for the first time in Barcelona in 1958. On that occasion the author arrived from Lima and was going to Madrid to study at the Complutense.

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Aquellos años del Boom en Barcelona

 11/02/2016 - 10:45

La estatua de Cristóbal Colón con el dedo índice apuntando a América es probablemente uno de los monumentos más emblemáticos de Barcelona. Está situada al final de la Rambla, frente al puerto viejo, desde donde hoy zarpan unas embarcaciones de recreo llamadas Las Golondrinas, muy concurridas entre los turistas. En ese mismo lugar, procedente de la misma dirección a la que sigue apuntando el dedo de Colón, desembarcó por primera vez a Barcelona el escritor peruano Mario Vargas Llosa, en 1958.

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Se lanzará la primera antología de ficción especulativa latina desde Philly

 09/18/2014 - 10:31
Matthew Goodwin con su esposa, Nahir Otaño-Gracia, e hija, Violet Goodwin-Otaño. 

El próximo verano, Matt Goodwin tiene planes de lanzar la primerísima antología de ficción especulativa escrita por Latinos titulada “Latino/a Rising”. Desde este momento su lista de autores es geográficamente diversa: los escritores proceden de California y Carolina del Norte, Filadelfia y Arizona.

Plain Text Author: 
Sabrina Vourvoulias
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First ever anthology of speculative fiction by U.S. Latino writers will be launched from Philly

 09/18/2014 - 10:13
Matthew Goodwin with his wife, Nahir Otaño-Gracia, and daughter, Violet Goodwin-Otaño. 

Next summer, Matt Goodwin plans to launch the first ever anthology of speculative fiction by Latino/a writers called “Latino/a Rising.” As of now his authors list is geographically diverse: writers come from California and North Carolina, Philadelphia and Arizona.

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