literature

Cuba's Floridita, birthplace of the daiquiri and Hemingway hangout, turns 200

 08/17/2017 - 05:22
A waitress serves several daiquiris at the Floridita bar/restaurant in Havana, Cuba, 16 August 2017. The daiquiri attracts thousands to its birthplace, Floridita, which is marking its 200th anniversary, each year, but perhaps the establishment is best known as having been a frequent hangout of late Nobel literature laureate Ernest Hemingway during his long stays in Cuba. EFE/Alejandro Ernesto

Although Hemingway has a place of honor in Floridita, Constantino Ribailagua - a Catalan immigrant known as "Constante" who was the owner of the bar in the early 20th century and created some of its most famous concoctions - is its most venerated figure.

Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 5:09am
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EFE

[OP-ED]: Publishers shouldn’t confine Latino authors to just ‘immigrant stories’

 08/15/2017 - 11:41
According to Pew, 68 percent of all Hispanics speak English proficiently. And, in 2013, the center noted that they tipped over into preferring English-language news, signaling that there may be some mismatch between what Latino readers say they want and what they will actually consume. 

 A day or so after Sonia Sotomayor’s biography, “My Beloved World” was released, I got a call from a New York Times reporter asking me how well the book would sell. She jumped in to the first question: “Why don’t Latinos read?”

Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - 10:32am

Muere el filósofo y poeta Ramon Xirau, voz del exilio español en Mexico

 07/28/2017 - 06:18
Spanish-born philosopher and poet Ramon Xirau is seen at his Mexico City home in a photo taken Jan. 20, 2014. EFE/Mario Guzman/File

El poeta llegó a México con sus padres cuando tenía 15 años, tras la caída del ejército republicano en la guerra civil española. Considerado uno de los máximos exponentes de la poesía y el pensamiento mexicanos, Xirau fue, según su amigo Octavio Paz, "un puente entre América y Europa."  

Friday, July 28, 2017 - 4:38am
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[OP-ED]: By all means, take issue with ‘The Bell Curve.’ But read it first

 06/23/2017 - 08:47
t’s a shame that the controversy regarding “The Bell Curve” centered on the book’s delineation of the differences in measured intelligence between blacks and whites

When “The Bell Curve” by Charles A. Murray and Richard Herrnstein was published in 1994, I was a junior in college and didn’t know anything about the book except that it had my white literature professors in an uproar. A few of them inveighed against the book’s premise -- the very notion of intelligence as something people possess in varying degrees -- and then the whole controversy eventually died out.

Friday, June 23, 2017 - 8:15am

[OP-ED]: Anti-Latino rhetoric is building walls within our schools

 05/31/2017 - 11:12
Latino boys, “may already face social pressures that discourage self-regulatory behaviors in academic settings (e.g. peer pressure to appear to not care about school).”

It is said that your perception is your reality. This truth is more important to understand than ever since some of us are living in a time when reality is skewed by perceptions shaped by falsehoods from people in power.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 - 11:00am
Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda