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[OP-ED]: The curse of middle-aged capitalism -- for Trump and all of us

 08/21/2017 - 13:57
In 1995, the largest five firms by market “capitalization” (the value of a company’s shares) were old-line businesses: Exxon, AT&T, Coca Cola, General Electric and Merck. By 2015, only Exxon (now Exxon Mobil) remained.

 A persisting puzzle about the U.S. economy is how it can seem both strong and weak. On the one hand, it remains a citadel of innovation, producing new companies like Uber. On the other, the economy is expanding at a snail’s pace of 2 percent annually since 2010. How could both be true? Why isn’t innovation translating into faster growth? The answer -- or part of the answer -- is that American businesses are running on two separate tracks. Call them the “youthful” and “middle-aged” tracks.

[OP-ED]: El gran debate de Trump sobre el crecimiento económico

 08/15/2017 - 10:01
No hay suficiente dinero para satisfacer todas nuestras demandas, incluso a tasas más altas de crecimiento económico. Habrá conflictos entre gastos privados y gubernamentales; entre gastos nacionales y locales; entre gastos de salud y gastos de no-salud; y entre gastos dedicados a los ancianos versus los jóvenes. El presente es polémico; el futuro quizás sea peor.

La discusión entre el gobierno de Trump y sus críticos sobre una tasa de crecimiento económico sostenible suscita profundas preguntas sobre el futuro de Estados Unidos. ¿Ingresamos en un período prolongado de crecimiento económico lento? Si es así, ¿cómo altera eso la sociedad y la política? ¿O acaso las medidas “correctas” elevarán el crecimiento económico a niveles del pasado?

[OP-ED]: Trump’s great growth debate

 08/09/2017 - 08:58
There isn’t enough money to satisfy all our demands, even at higher rates of economic growth. There will be conflicts between private and governmental spending; between national and local spending; between health spending and non-health spending; and between spending on the old versus the young. The present is contentious; the future may be worse.

The argument between the Trump administration and its critics over a sustainable rate of economic growth raises profound questions about America’s future. Have we entered a prolonged period of slow growth? If so, how does that alter society and politics? Or will the “right” policies raise growth to past levels? 

If you haven’t paid attention, here’s a brief overview of the debate.

[OP-ED]: Amid Trump’s chaos, a post-American world emerges

 08/01/2017 - 09:10
In 2008, I wrote a book about the emerging “Post-American World,” which was, I noted at the start, not about the decline of America but rather the rise of the rest. Amid the parochialism, ineptitude and sheer disarray of the Trump presidency, the post-American world is coming to fruition much faster than I ever expected.

 In London last week, I met a Nigerian man who succinctly expressed the reaction of much of the world to America these days. “Your country has gone crazy,” he said, with a mixture of outrage and amusement. “I’m from Africa. I know crazy, but I didn’t ever think I would see this in America!”

Could a Mathematical Formula stop the extinction of species?

 07/26/2017 - 07:11
Hugh Possingham, chief scientist of the NGO The Nature Conservancy, who presented in Colombia this week a controversial mathematical formula that measures the cost-benefit of saving different species, in order to decide which should be given priority. EFE/NGO The Nature Conservancy

Math has already been used effectively in defining protected areas in places with productive activities in 150 countries over the past 15 years. The best example of that application is Australia's Great Barrier Reef, where a software called Marxan permitted the expansion of protected areas from 5 percent to 35 percent while preserving species and improving fishing. 

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

US-India: Trump and Modi pledge cooperation, avoid tensions on immigration

 06/27/2017 - 06:57
US President Donald J. Trump (R), with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (L), delivers remarks during a ceremony in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, USA, 26 June 2017. EPA/SHAWN THEW

In their first official meeting, the President of the United States and the Indian Prime Minister talked about trade and defense cooperation, terrorism, but avoided immigration and climate change, issues in which both leaders differ. India is the country most affected by Trump's decision to tighten controls on granting the H-1B visa, which benefits foreign workers.

 

Plain Text Author: 
EFE