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 La mayor parte del nuevo libro del economista Tyler Cowen, titulado “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream”, es una lectura mega-deprimente.

Inequality is rising. Segregation by socioeconomic class, educational attainment and race is skyrocketing. The country is generally less dynamic and more risk-averse -- when people have the opportunity to move for a better quality of life or more rewarding job, they tend to settle for staying put.

Black Women from Latin America Get Ready to Face Challenges Ahead

 07/26/2017 - 06:31
Network of Afro-Latin American, Afro-Caribbean and Diaspora Women (RMAAD) Southern Cone coordinator Vicenta Camusso speaks during a press conference held on July 25, 2017, in Montevideo, Uruguay, to discuss the organization's 25th anniversary. EFE/Federico Anfitti

The main task ahead for Afro-descendants is to "make definitive progress to close the economic gap since, in Latin America and the Caribbean, poverty has a face and a color, according to the coordinator of the Network of Afro-Latin American, Afro-Caribbean and Diaspora Women (RMAAD)

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: La asombrosa mala calidad del sistema de atención odontológica en Estados Unidos

 07/24/2017 - 08:22
Reviví en detalles viscerales y morbosos mis recuerdos dolorosos de abscesos, tratamientos de conducto, extracciones de premolares y otras cosas más al leer el libro triste y horrible de Mary Otto: “Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality and the Struggle for Oral Health in America” (Dientes: una historia de belleza, inequidad y dificultades para la salud oral en Estados Unidos). 

Di a luz a tres bebés, me quebré la muñeca, me fracturé el coxis dos veces, incluso me hice tatuajes y, una vez, cuando sospechaban que había contraído el virus del Nilo, me hicieron dos punciones lumbares (una falló) para potenciar el conocimientos de los estudiantes de medicina a la vez que se aseguraban del diagnóstico.

[OP-ED]: By all means, take issue with ‘The Bell Curve.’ But read it first

 06/23/2017 - 08:47
t’s a shame that the controversy regarding “The Bell Curve” centered on the book’s delineation of the differences in measured intelligence between blacks and whites

When “The Bell Curve” by Charles A. Murray and Richard Herrnstein was published in 1994, I was a junior in college and didn’t know anything about the book except that it had my white literature professors in an uproar. A few of them inveighed against the book’s premise -- the very notion of intelligence as something people possess in varying degrees -- and then the whole controversy eventually died out.

[OP-ED]: America’s postindustrial blues

 06/22/2017 - 09:43
Says Richard Reeves of the Brookings Institution in his new book “Dream Hoarders.” We should not be surprised that 58 percent of whites and 67 percent of whites without a college degree voted for Trump.

Ever since Donald Trump’s election, a cottage industry of politicians, journalists, scholars and commentators has sought to understand what motivates Trump supporters. Theories have ranged from globalization to a rebellion against Washington elitism to racism. But the true cause may have been overlooked: the “postindustrial society.”

Latin America doubles students in higher education, but inequality persists

 05/18/2017 - 06:02
 Students during a public event in Mexico City, Mexico, on May 3, 2017. EFE/Jorge Nuñez

The increase in students, who currently number 20 million in the region, has benefited Latin America in terms of young people coming from lower and medium socioeconomic environments. But challenges persist, including the high dropout rate and the connections to the labor market, according to World Bank report.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: Is the American dream on a ‘self-defeating quest’?

 04/04/2017 - 15:06
 La mayor parte del nuevo libro del economista Tyler Cowen, titulado “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream”, es una lectura mega-deprimente.

Inequality is rising. Segregation by socioeconomic class, educational attainment and race is skyrocketing. The country is generally less dynamic and more risk-averse -- when people have the opportunity to move for a better quality of life or more rewarding job, they tend to settle for staying put.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Is the American Dream killing us?

 04/04/2017 - 10:31
One theory attributes the spike in “deaths of despair” to growing income inequality. There would be fewer suicides, drug overdoses and alcohol-related deaths if incomes were distributed more equally, the argument goes. People take out their frustrations and anger by resorting to self-destructive behavior.

It isn’t often that economics raises the most profound questions of human existence, but recent work of economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton (husband and wife, both of Princeton University) comes close. You may recall that a few years ago, Case and Deaton reported the startling finding that the death rates of non-Hispanic middle-aged whites had gotten worse — they were dying younger.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Should the Fed run the economy ‘hot’?

 03/14/2017 - 17:44
The recovery, though encouraging, is certainly no economic panacea. Mounting inequality remains a big issue. From 2000 to 2016, the best-paid 5 percent of men achieved a 30 percent wage increase, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data analyzed by Gould. For women, the comparable gain was 24 percent.

Toward the end of 1942, Winston Churchill, in announcing a rare victory over the German army, uttered one of his more memorable phrases: “This is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.” The same might be said today of the American economic recovery. Progress, though real, is incomplete.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

This is not a celebration, this is a claim for our rights!

 03/10/2017 - 01:48
Hundreds of women took the streets in downtown Philly to raise their voices against the laboral, political and economic inequities. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DÍA News.

Even before five o'clock in the afternoon, dozens of women with posters, megaphones, and pink caps were being seen walking downtown. The meeting was in Logan Square, in the heart of Philadelphia. The occasion? Well, that depends on the perspective: for an unaware bystander (who generally has no perspective), it was one more celebration of International Women's Day. 

Plain Text Author: 
Edwin López Moya

[OP-ED]: Viewing minorities as monolithic groups only exacerbates inequality

 01/31/2017 - 15:29
People along with members of the Senate and the US House. Participate at a rally in opposition to the US President's immigration ban. Donald Trump, in front of the Supreme Court in Washington. EFE

“Disaggregation” is not a word that rolls off the tongue easily. But the concept of separating a whole into its distinct parts is one that we should embrace when it comes to statistics about minorities.

The time when it was sufficient to break out data by simple race or ethnicity segments has past. Demographics and new sociological and scientific understanding about the people that make up the broad categories of black, Asian and Hispanic tell us that these labels are becoming increasingly blunt instruments when we look at public health and education policy.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

Philadelphia examines crisis in Puerto Rico

 08/01/2016 - 17:34
Protests in Philadelphia continue.

In a packed auditorium inside of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, community leaders, activists and guests lined up to attend the special event, Latino Politics: Philadelphia and Puerto Rico. During the impressive panel discussion, notable community leaders discussed the rich and unique history shared between Puerto Rico and Philadelphia.

Plain Text Author: 
Jamila Johnson