incomes

Latin America doubles students in higher education, but inequality persists

 05/18/2017 - 06:02
 Students during a public event in Mexico City, Mexico, on May 3, 2017. EFE/Jorge Nuñez

The increase in students, who currently number 20 million in the region, has benefited Latin America in terms of young people coming from lower and medium socioeconomic environments. But challenges persist, including the high dropout rate and the connections to the labor market, according to World Bank report.

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Posted Date: 
Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 6:00am
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EFE
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 Students during a public event in Mexico City, Mexico, on May 3, 2017. EFE/Jorge Nuñez

[OP-ED]: Our Education, Born from Swamps

 05/15/2017 - 15:27
In lower income neighborhoods, students can struggle without access to proper educational materials, exposure, and parental poverty. 
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The story of education in lower income neighborhoods is an all too familiar one. The struggle to obtain a stable education is a story of overcoming conditions that are less than favorable, much like the swamp plant. What is causing these students, especially Latinos, to fall behind? How can they grow from these meager and impoverished conditions?  

Posted Date: 
Monday, May 15, 2017 - 2:30pm
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In lower income neighborhoods, students can struggle without access to proper educational materials, exposure, and parental poverty. 

[OP-ED]: The bumpy road to adulthood

 04/27/2017 - 14:43
The Great Recession’s high unemployment surely drove many young people back to their parents. The actual number of 18- to 34-year-olds living at home totaled 24 million in 2015. Two-thirds say they’re happy with their home life. The fact that more Americans go to college and graduate school than in the past has also delayed marriage, living independently and having children.
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Growing up isn’t what it used to be. There’s a yawning gap between the end of adolescence and the beginning of adulthood: a period when millions of 20-somethings and 30-somethings have many adult freedoms without all the responsibilities. Social scientists have tried -- so far in vain -- to name this new life-stage, but no one should question its significance.

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Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 10:00am
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Robert J. Samuelson
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The Great Recession’s high unemployment surely drove many young people back to their parents. The actual number of 18- to 34-year-olds living at home totaled 24 million in 2015. Two-thirds say they’re happy with their home life. The fact that more Americans go to college and graduate school than in the past has also delayed marriage, living independently and having children.

[OP-ED]: Illegal immigrants pay taxes, too

 04/24/2017 - 08:15
Un miembro del grupo de activistas por los derechos de los inmigrantes "Border Angels", enciende una vela durante una vigilia por uno de los miembros del grupo, Hugo Castro, en San Diego, California, EE.UU.Castro desapareció en el centro de México después de publicar un video en Facebook donde informó que lo estaban siguiendo. EFE
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The reason immigrant appreciation efforts, like the “Day Without Immigrants” events this past February, fall flat is because few people really feel any pain.

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Friday, April 21, 2017 - 10:30am
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Esther Cepeda
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A member of the group of immigrant rights activists Border Angels lights a candle during a vigil by one of the members of the group, Hugo Castro, in San Diego, California, USA. Castro disappeared in central Mexico after publishing a video on Facebook where he reported that he was being followed. EFE

Face to Face: French Voters Choose Centrist and Far-Right Candidates for Presidency

 04/24/2017 - 02:17
French presidential election candidate for the 'En Marche!' (Onwards!) political movement, Emmanuel Macron celebrates after the first round of the French presidential elections in Paris, France, 23 April 2017. EPA/YOAN VALAT

Emmanuel Macron (Center) and Marine Le Pen (far right) advanced to the runoff in France’s presidential elections on May 7. After the UK’s vote to leave the European Union and the US vote for the political novice Donald Trump as president, the French presidential race is the latest election to shake up establishment politics by kicking out the figures that stood for the status quo. 

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Monday, April 24, 2017 - 2:00am
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French presidential election candidate for the 'En Marche!' (Onwards!) political movement, Emmanuel Macron celebrates after the first round of the French presidential elections in Paris, France, 23 April 2017. EPA/YOAN VALAT

[OP-ED]: Are living standards truly stagnant?

 04/13/2017 - 08:14
A causa del aumento de la desigualdad, muchos norteamericanos “se sienten peor ... incluso cuando su consumo material de bienes esté aumentando.” O quizás sea la decepción. La gente obtuvo menos de lo que esperaba, y el ritmo del cambio fue tan lento que pareció un estancamiento.
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It may turn out that the widespread belief that most Americans’ incomes have stagnated for years is, well, false or at least overstated.

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Thursday, April 13, 2017 - 8:00am
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Robert J. Samuelson
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The rise in inequality may make Americans “feel worse ... even if their material goods consumption is rising.” Or maybe it’s just disappointment. People got less than they expected, and the pace of change was so slow that it seemed like stagnation.

Vicente Fox without the "F" word

 04/12/2017 - 18:52
Vicente Fox le concedió una entrevista exclusiva a AL DÍA News durante su visita a Filadelfia, invitado por el World Affairs Council of Philadelphia. Foto: Peter Fitzpatrick/AL DÍA News. 

The former president of Mexico came to Philadelphia to talk about the wall, this time in a very different way.  

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Posted Date: 
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 1:00pm
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Edwin López Moya
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Vicente Fox granted an exclusive interview to AL DÍA News during his visit to Philadelphia, invited by the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia. Photo: Peter Fitzpatrick / AL DÍA News.

[OP-ED]: Is the American Dream killing us?

 04/04/2017 - 10:31
One theory attributes the spike in “deaths of despair” to growing income inequality. There would be fewer suicides, drug overdoses and alcohol-related deaths if incomes were distributed more equally, the argument goes. People take out their frustrations and anger by resorting to self-destructive behavior.
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It isn’t often that economics raises the most profound questions of human existence, but recent work of economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton (husband and wife, both of Princeton University) comes close. You may recall that a few years ago, Case and Deaton reported the startling finding that the death rates of non-Hispanic middle-aged whites had gotten worse — they were dying younger.

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Tuesday, April 4, 2017 - 8:15am
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Robert J. Samuelson
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One theory attributes the spike in “deaths of despair” to growing income inequality. There would be fewer suicides, drug overdoses and alcohol-related deaths if incomes were distributed more equally, the argument goes. People take out their frustrations and anger by resorting to self-destructive behavior.

Black, Latino Communities Spending Almost Half Their Incomes on Rent

 03/31/2017 - 06:17
 In cities like Los Angeles, renters in white communities spend 50 percent of their income on rent — well above the recommended 30 percent, but still far less than renters in Hispanic neighborhoods, who pay a premium of 63 percent.

Renters living in predominantly Hispanic or black neighborhoods have to spend more of their income on rent than those in white communities. Devoting nearly half of one’s income to rent each month makes economic mobility that much harder as well.

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Posted Date: 
Friday, March 31, 2017 - 6:00am
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AL DIA News
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 In cities like Los Angeles, renters in white communities spend 50 percent of their income on rent — well above the recommended 30 percent, but still far less than renters in Hispanic neighborhoods, who pay a premium of 63 percent.

Latino Insurance Executive Blasts Trump Health Care Bill

 03/22/2017 - 08:17
US President Donald J. Trump (C) and Human Services secretary Tom Price (L) walk to a meeting with House Republicans to encourage a deal on the American Health Care Act in the US Capitol in Washington, DC, USA, 21 March 2017. EPA/SHAWN THEW
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Mario Molina, CEO of Molina Healthcare, the 10th largest health insurance company in the U.S, thinks the Republican Health Care bill "is terrible". 

 

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Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 8:00am
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AL DIA News
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US President Donald J. Trump (C) and Human Services secretary Tom Price (L) walk to a meeting with House Republicans to encourage a deal on the American Health Care Act in the US Capitol in Washington, DC, USA, 21 March 2017. EPA/SHAWN THEW