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Stepping-up the fight for immigrants

 06/21/2017 - 17:04
Abel Rodríguez, Cabrini University, Center on Immigration
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A Latino professor leads Philadelphia's first academic Center on Immigration issues.

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Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - 12:15pm
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With the Center on Immigration, Cabrini's goal is to become a regional leader in creating knowledge about issues that affect immigrant communities in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania. Samantha Laub / AL DÍA News

[OP-ED]: Trump’s persecutors are going off the rails

 06/16/2017 - 11:10
Not to get too technical, but the evidence shows that Trump’s persecutors -- in the media, Congress and the nation’s law schools -- have gone off the rails. They’re not thinking clearly. In some cases, they’re not thinking at all. EFE
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here are some basic truths that hold even during the Trump-inspired meltdown of the modern media.

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Friday, June 16, 2017 - 11:00am
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Not to get too technical, but the evidence shows that Trump’s persecutors -- in the media, Congress and the nation’s law schools -- have gone off the rails. They’re not thinking clearly. In some cases, they’re not thinking at all. EFE

Portland attack: Pressure on Donald Trump to make statement about double murder

 05/29/2017 - 05:45
 Congress Street, Portland. Photo: Wikimedia
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On Sunday, the President tweeted about Tax Cuts and new G.O.P Healthcare plan, but avoided commenting on the alleged white supremacist that killed two men protecting a Muslim girl from his hate bullying words on Portland commuter train. 

 

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Monday, May 29, 2017 - 5:15am
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 Congress Street, Portland. Photo: Wikimedia

Latin America doubles students in higher education, but inequality persists

 05/18/2017 - 06:02
 Students during a public event in Mexico City, Mexico, on May 3, 2017. EFE/Jorge Nuñez

The increase in students, who currently number 20 million in the region, has benefited Latin America in terms of young people coming from lower and medium socioeconomic environments. But challenges persist, including the high dropout rate and the connections to the labor market, according to World Bank report.

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Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 6:00am
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EFE
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 Students during a public event in Mexico City, Mexico, on May 3, 2017. EFE/Jorge Nuñez

Despite the unjust deportations they face today, this town supported Trump

 05/17/2017 - 14:42
Armando Páez interviewed by The Chicago Tribune, May 11, 2017. Source: http://www.chicagotribune.com/

The residents of Elkhart (Indiana) valued Trump's political speech, considering the serious unemployment they faced. Now, they have decided to react against the deportation of an illegal immigrant.

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Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 1:45pm
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Armando Páez interviewed by The Chicago Tribune, May 11, 2017. Source: http://www.chicagotribune.com/

[OP-ED]: Our Education, Born from Swamps

 05/15/2017 - 15:27
In lower income neighborhoods, students can struggle without access to proper educational materials, exposure, and parental poverty. 
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The story of education in lower income neighborhoods is an all too familiar one. The struggle to obtain a stable education is a story of overcoming conditions that are less than favorable, much like the swamp plant. What is causing these students, especially Latinos, to fall behind? How can they grow from these meager and impoverished conditions?  

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Monday, May 15, 2017 - 2:30pm
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In lower income neighborhoods, students can struggle without access to proper educational materials, exposure, and parental poverty. 

California’s new attorney general, Xavier Becerra, prepares to battle Trump.

 05/01/2017 - 14:04
From left to right, Congressman Xavier Becerra; Senator Elizabeth Warren; Senator Cory Booker; Congressman John Sarbanes Congressman John Delaney (Panelist) on April 6, 2016, at a meeting with  former Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. Photo: US Labor Department/Wikipedia
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 Born in Sacramento, Xavier Becerra is the son of working-class immigrants from Jalisco, Mexico, and the first person in his familiy to graduate from college.

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Monday, May 1, 2017 - 1:45pm
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From left to right, Congressman Xavier Becerra; Senator Elizabeth Warren; Senator Cory Booker; Congressman John Sarbanes Congressman John Delaney (Panelist) on April 6, 2016, at a meeting with  former Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. Photo: US Labor Department/Wikipedia

[OP-ED]: The bumpy road to adulthood

 04/27/2017 - 14:43
The Great Recession’s high unemployment surely drove many young people back to their parents. The actual number of 18- to 34-year-olds living at home totaled 24 million in 2015. Two-thirds say they’re happy with their home life. The fact that more Americans go to college and graduate school than in the past has also delayed marriage, living independently and having children.
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Growing up isn’t what it used to be. There’s a yawning gap between the end of adolescence and the beginning of adulthood: a period when millions of 20-somethings and 30-somethings have many adult freedoms without all the responsibilities. Social scientists have tried -- so far in vain -- to name this new life-stage, but no one should question its significance.

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Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 10:00am
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Robert J. Samuelson
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The Great Recession’s high unemployment surely drove many young people back to their parents. The actual number of 18- to 34-year-olds living at home totaled 24 million in 2015. Two-thirds say they’re happy with their home life. The fact that more Americans go to college and graduate school than in the past has also delayed marriage, living independently and having children.

[OP-ED]: The importance of minority teachers in our schools

 04/27/2017 - 14:30
According to a new statistical analysis by the U.S. Department of Education, even though minority teachers remain underrepresented, both the number and proportion of minority teachers in elementary and high schools grew by 104 percent between 1987-88 and 2011-12, compared with 38 percent growth in the number of white teachers.
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Black teachers make a difference.

I know because I attended a prestigious college-preparatory public high school in the heart of Chicago where approximately half of the teachers were black. They included my AP Biology teacher and AP English teacher, several of my art teachers, one of my history teachers, a chemistry teacher -- and probably many more I’m forgetting in the haze of the past quarter-century.

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Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 10:30am
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Esther Cepeda
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According to a new statistical analysis by the U.S. Department of Education, even though minority teachers remain underrepresented, both the number and proportion of minority teachers in elementary and high schools grew by 104 percent between 1987-88 and 2011-12, compared with 38 percent growth in the number of white teachers.

Are Latino students worse at Math?

 04/26/2017 - 05:53
President Barack Obama views student projects created on laptops during a tour at Mooresville Middle School in Mooresville, N.C., June 6, 2013 (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

A new paper examines how race affects a student's Math education and the creation of racial advantages and disadvantages at school.

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Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 5:30am
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President Barack Obama views student projects created on laptops during a tour at Mooresville Middle School in Mooresville, N.C., June 6, 2013 (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)