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Rock and Roll and Resistance: A Conversation with Alejandro Escovedo

 08/11/2017 - 12:25
Alejandro Escovedo for Burn Something Beautiful by Nancy Rankin Escovedo 

Mexican-American musician and activist Alejandro Escovedo elucidates on his immigrant roots, his take on the government, his brush with death, and how the stories he feels compelled to compose transcend the genre of rock and roll. Escovedo will be strumming alongside Texan legend Joe Ely at Ardmore Music Hall on August 19th, 2017.

Dolores del Río: Cuando la leyenda se convierte en un Doodle de Google

 08/09/2017 - 14:56
"Celebrating Dolores del Río" by Google 

Mucho antes de que los rostros de Ana de la Reguera, Kate del Castillo, Penélope Cruz y Salma Hayek abandonaran las portadas de la  ¡HOLA! y Vanidades para embellecer los tabloides de Hollywood y las colas de las salas ACME, había existido ya una belleza española de gran talento: Dolores del Río.

 

Dolores del Río: When Legends become Doodles

 08/03/2017 - 13:48
"Celebrating Dolores del Río" by Google 

Acclaimed "Golden Age" Mexican actress Dolores del Río is honored today in a floral Google Doodle as gorgeous as she was. A society heiress, a mistress to Orson Welles, a victim of McCarthyism, a spokeswoman for UNICEF, and a beauty that reportedly slept "sixteen hours a day" to keep her youthful looks, here's a look at the life of Dolores. 

Artista Latina de Philly premiada con prestigiosa beca por su activismo social

 07/31/2017 - 12:12
"We Are Human Beings" installed in front of the ICE building in Philadelphia. A work by Latino artist Michelle Angela Ortiz. Photo Credit: Steve Weinik

Michelle Angela Ortiz, nacida en el seno de una familia de inmigrantes Latinos de South Philly, es uno de los nueve artistas de todo el país premiados con la prestigiosa beca de $100,000 otorgada por la Robert Rauschenberg Foundation a los artistas con demostrado compromiso social. 

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[OP-ED]: On North Korea, hope is not a strategy

 07/11/2017 - 15:46
Kim Jong Un is a young man but has been highly effective at preserving his authority. He has secured the support of the military and sidelined or killed anyone who threatened his grip on power -- including his uncle and, allegedly, his half-brother. EFE

In Washington, there is a conventional wisdom on North Korea that spans both parties and much of elite opinion. It goes roughly like this: North Korea is the world’s most bizarre country, run by a crackpot dictator with a strange haircut. He is unpredictable and irrational and cannot be negotiated with. Eventually this weird and cruel regime will collapse. Meanwhile, the only solution is more and more pressure. But what if the conventional wisdom is wrong?

[OP-ED]: America & me: A love story

 07/06/2017 - 14:05
A group of deported veterans protested in honor of deported veterans who have died outside the United States, and demanded changes to laws that would give veterans deported access to medical benefits. EFE

At the risk of setting off more fireworks, I’ve spent the days surrounding the Fourth of July trying to answer a question that has perplexed U.S. Latinos for generations. Whether the yardstick is starting businesses, creating jobs, spreading opportunity, serving in uniform or displaying optimism in hard times, America’s largest minority has shown time and again that we love this country. 

But does the country love us back?

Trump meets with victims of crimes by undocumented immigrants

 06/29/2017 - 03:38
US President Donald J. Trump (C) listens as he meets with immigration crime victims to urge passage of House legislation to save American lives, in the Cabinet Room at the White House, Washington, DC, USA, 28 June 2017. EPA/Molly Riley / POOL

On Thursday the House of Representatives is scheduled to hold two "crucial votes" on immigration and national security bills, both sponsored by Republican Congressmen Bob Goodlatte of Virginia. One of the bills, dubbed Kate's Law, is designed to increase the penalties for immigrants convicted of certain crimes who, after being deported, have returned to the US illegally.

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EFE

In Search of the Maya World: From Central America to Philadelphia

 06/27/2017 - 14:26
Gallery of archaeological pieces of Mayan culture exhibited at the Museum of Archeology and Anthropology of the University of Pennsylvania. Photo: Supplied UPEnn

One of the most intriguing mysteries of Latin American culture is what happened to the Maya civilization. How come after over 3,000 years of history, from about 2, 500 BC to 950 AD, most of the glorious Maya centers in Mesoamerica were abandoned? Before the arrival of the Europeans in the 1500’s magnificent cities like Tikal in Guatemala and Copán in Honduras had all but disappeared; left uninhabited, they were covered by thick jungle growth, hidden throughout the mountains and the lowlands. 

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