ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

[OP-ED]: What really happened to coal?

 06/12/2017 - 08:58
Even if environmental regulation and climate change didn’t exist, the coal industry would have faced intense pressures to change and adapt. Government isn’t killing the coal industry. “Progress is the culprit,” concludes Kolstad’s study.

 The coal-mining jobs that President Trump thinks were destroyed by government regulation -- adopted to combat air pollution and global warming -- were actually lost to old-fashioned competition from other American firms and workers. Eastern coal mines lost market share to Western coal, which was cheaper. And natural gas grew at coal’s expense because it had low costs and lower greenhouse gas emissions.

Monday, June 12, 2017 - 8:45am

Why EPA has dismissed half of its key board’s scientific advisers?

 05/10/2017 - 04:10
Scott Pruitt, the EPA administrator, has chosen not to renew the terms of nine of the 18-member board of scientific counselors, which advises the EPA on the quality and accuracy of the science it produces. Photo: Wikipedia

Nine scientists have been dismissed from the EPA’s 18-person Board of Scientific Counselors—ostensibly to include more voices from regulated industries, though the scientists say their work was apolitical and did not involve regulations. The US government has also postponed an important meeting scheduled for Tuesday to determine whether the country should or should not withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change, a matter that President Donald Trump promised to decide this month.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 3:30am
Author: 

[OP-ED]: Will Ecuador’s new president get rid of Julian Assange?

 04/14/2017 - 09:37
The incoming president has promised reform. But first Moreno needs to get his troublesome houseguest off the country’s couch so Assange can stop sucking all the air out of Ecuador’s faint presence on the world stage. 

Last week, the people of Ecuador elected a leftist named after the communist dictator Vladimir Lenin as their new president. 

It’s always a double-edged sword when Ecuador is in the news -- in the U.S., the little-known country at the equator usually flies far under the radar.

Friday, April 14, 2017 - 9:15am
Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

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