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[OP-ED]: Take this taco and make it your own

 06/30/2017 - 11:32
Gustavo Arellano, author of “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.” said: “[It is laughable] that white people aren’t supposed to -- pick your word -- rip off or appropriate or get ‘inspired’ by Mexican food, that comida mexicana is a sacrosanct tradition only Mexicans and the white girls we marry can participate in.

Picture this: Taco fixins in a tortilla cone. A flour tortilla cone, no less. 

It comes to you courtesy of a new Food Network explainer video titled “Taco Cones are the New Tacos” in which a young Asian-American woman demonstrates how to “eat two tacos at the same time” by baking tortillas into an ice cream cone shape, filling them with ground beef and adding toppings.

Friday, June 30, 2017 - 11:15am

[OP-ED]: La madre de todos los ‘blufs’

 04/19/2017 - 08:02
Afortunadamente, no es solo el pánico lo que se expande, también lo hace la resistencia, que cada día crece y se fortalece. Y eso es muy bueno.

Sí, eso es lo que retórica recalentada de Washington sobre Corea del Norte –a la que el país asiático responde en tonos igualmente belicosos – es en realidad: una sucia guerra de palabras. Pero puede estar seguro de que no están a punto de intercambiarse balas, cohetes, la madre de todas las bombas y mucho menos armas atómicas. Lo cual, por supuesto, es muy bueno.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 6:15pm
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[OP-ED]: The Mother of All Bluffs

 04/18/2017 - 18:22
Not only panic is spreading, resistance is also growing by leaps and bounds.EFE

Yes, that’s what the heated rhetoric coming from Washington about North Korea –and being responded to in no less bellicose tones by the Asian country – is: a nasty war of words. Rest assured that no bullets, no rockets, no mother of all bombs, not to mention atomic weapons are about to be fired, dropped or exchanged. Which, of course, is great.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 6:15pm
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[OP-ED]: Is your phone eavesdropping on your conversation about cannibalism? Mine may have.

 03/08/2017 - 18:41

Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you were to read biology professor Bill Schutt’s new book “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” you’d have lots to talk about at the dinner table.

There are, for instance, sections on how cannibalism is portrayed in popular culture, news stories and historical texts. Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.

Thursday, March 9, 2017 - 7:10am
Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda