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The president of the United States, Donald J. Trump, speaks during a rally in Evansville (Indiana). EFE

The results of the primary elections have shown the rise of the Democratic Party at the national level, especially in the hands of progressive candidates, women, and people of color. So, what would it really mean if the Democrats retake the House in November?

[OP-ED]: The Democrats should rethink immigration absolutism

 08/08/2017 - 08:09
Republican senators from North Carolina Thom Tillis, Wyoming John Barrsso (left) and Texas John Cornyn give a press conference to present the Republican legislative proposal to increase border security and tightening of immigration laws on Capitol Hill, Washington DC (United States). EFE

In 1992, the Democratic Party faced a challenge on the issue of abortion. Pennsylvania’s governor, Robert Casey, a Democrat dedicated to the working class, asked to speak at the national convention in New York City. He wanted to propose a pro-life plank for the party platform, mostly as a way of affirming his Catholic beliefs.

[OP-ED]: Hispanics’ sunny spirit is a reminder of what made America great

 07/31/2017 - 08:28
A group of people perform a vigil, in El Paso, Texas, in honor of the Guatemalan immigrants who died this week trying to cross the Rio Grande, also known as the Rio Bravo, which serves as the border between the United States and the United States. And MexicoEFE

 News headlines are screaming about how fearful Latinos are due to moves the Trump administration is making toward stepping up deportations. These are valid concerns for many Hispanics, a majority of whom have acquaintances or family members who could be at risk.

[OP-ED]: Donald Trump’s lost opportunity

 07/26/2017 - 09:12
Donald Trump could have quickly begun reshaping American politics. He heard voices that others didn’t, understood what those people wanted to hear and articulated much of it. But when it came time to deliver, it turned out that he had no serious ideas, policies, nor even the desire to search for them. EFE

There are many ways to evaluate the Trump presidency at the six-month mark. What I am struck by is the path not taken, the lost opportunity. Donald Trump had many flaws, but during the campaign, he tapped into a real set of problems facing America and a deep frustration with the existing political system. Additionally, he embraced and expressed -- somewhat inconsistently -- a populism that went beyond the traditional left-right divide. What would things look like at this point if President Trump had governed in the manner of a pragmatic, jobs-oriented reformer who was relentlessly focused on the “forgotten” Americans of whom he often speaks?

[OP-ED]: Mad at everyone

 07/03/2017 - 17:41
Not surprisingly, the system has become self-perpetuating. It feeds on mutual recriminations. On this July 4, the Founders -- who had deep disagreements, but compromised -- would doubtlessly disapprove.

This is the summer of our discontent. As Americans celebrate July 4, they are mad at their leaders, mad at their government and mad at each other. A recent Pew poll finds that “public trust in government remains near historic lows.” Just 20 percent of Americans trust the government to “do the right thing just about always or most of the time.” The comparable figures were 40 percent in 2000 and almost 80 percent in the early 1960s. There has been a long-term loss of trust.

Republican health plan is a death sentence for US Latinos, Democrats say.

 06/29/2017 - 03:51
Spectators listen as US Democratic Senator from New Jersey Bob Menendez delivers remarks at a press conference in opposition to the Senate Republican health care bill on the US Capitol grounds in Washington, DC, USA, 28 June 2017. EPA/SHAWN THEW

The independent Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that under the bill drafted by Republican senators, roughly 22 million Americans would lose their health insurance by 2026.  That number includes some 6 million Latinos, 1 million of them children, according to La Raza.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

Republican divisions force postponement of healthcare bill vote

 06/28/2017 - 05:27
Senate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell (R) turns away from the microphones beside Republican Senator from Texas John Cornyn (L) after speaking to members of the news media outside the West Wing of the White House following a meeting to discuss healthcare legislation with Senate Republicans and US President Donald J. Trump, in Washington, DC, USA, 27 June 2017. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

 US Senate Republicans on Tuesday found themselves forced - due to internal divisions - to postpone a vote on the controversial bill designed to replace former President Barack Obama"s healthcare reform, a bill that could leave more than 20 million Americans without medical coverage.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

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