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democratic party

El legado de Rizzo: ¿se merece una estatua?

 08/18/2017 - 10:31
Frank Rizzo as mayor in 1977. Photo courtesy Special Collections Research Center, Temple University Libraries. Originally published on VICE. 

El futuro de la estatua del polémico ex comisario de policía y alcalde Frank Rizzo está en el banquillo, especialmente después de las manifestaciones de la semana pasada en Charlottesville, Virginia, que empezaron como una protesta en contra de la retirada de un monumento al general Confederado Robert E. Lee.

The Legacy of Rizzo: Does He Deserve to be Commemorated in Bronze?

 08/18/2017 - 10:25
Frank Rizzo statue. Samantha Laub/AL DÍA News

The future of a statue in the likeness of highly contentious former police commissioner and mayor Frank Rizzo is on the fritz, particularly after this past week’s rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia which began as a protest to keep a memorial to Confederate General Robert E. Lee from being removed.

[OP-ED]: The Democrats should rethink immigration absolutism

 08/08/2017 - 08:09
Republican senators from North Carolina Thom Tillis, Wyoming John Barrsso (left) and Texas John Cornyn give a press conference to present the Republican legislative proposal to increase border security and tightening of immigration laws on Capitol Hill, Washington DC (United States). EFE

In 1992, the Democratic Party faced a challenge on the issue of abortion. Pennsylvania’s governor, Robert Casey, a Democrat dedicated to the working class, asked to speak at the national convention in New York City. He wanted to propose a pro-life plank for the party platform, mostly as a way of affirming his Catholic beliefs.

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The Democratic Party has reacted to its series of recent election losses by once again concluding that it needs a better economic message. As Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said last Sunday, “Democrats need a strong, bold, sharp-edged and common-sense economic agenda.” EFE

The only disagreement within the party is about how sharp-edged and left-wing that message should be. But it is increasingly clear that the problem for Democrats has little to do with economics and much more to do with a cluster of issues they would rather not revisit -- about culture, social mores and national identity.