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In Search of the Maya World: From Central America to Philadelphia

 06/27/2017 - 14:26
Gallery of archaeological pieces of Mayan culture exhibited at the Museum of Archeology and Anthropology of the University of Pennsylvania. Photo: Supplied UPEnn

One of the most intriguing mysteries of Latin American culture is what happened to the Maya civilization. How come after over 3,000 years of history, from about 2, 500 BC to 950 AD, most of the glorious Maya centers in Mesoamerica were abandoned? Before the arrival of the Europeans in the 1500’s magnificent cities like Tikal in Guatemala and Copán in Honduras had all but disappeared; left uninhabited, they were covered by thick jungle growth, hidden throughout the mountains and the lowlands. 

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Pura Vida: A Pan-Latin paradise in Northern Liberties

 06/07/2017 - 19:39
Charles Álvarez, Pura Vida, Philadelphia Latino Food Revolution

When it comes to food, Philadelphia has little to envy to cities like New York. The culinary scene here is a reflection of the demographic explosion in which Latino immigrants have played a revolutionary role. With this article, AL DÍA News presents the series "Latino Food Revolution", a recognition to a social, cultural and economic phenomenom that creates employment and wealth in the city of brotherly love. 

Plain Text Author: 
Eli Siegel - Especial para AL DÍA News

Inside the tangled empire of the president's daughter

 05/01/2017 - 15:01
Ivanka Trump during the W20 summit in Berlin, on April 25, 2017. EFE/CLEMENS BILAN / POOL

Ethic experts are concerned that despite removing herself from the management of her Ivanka Trump fashion company and becoming an unpaid government employee in March, her political and business interests are still so closely linked that she is deep in an ethical “danger zone” over conflict of interest laws.

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Philly Latino Food Revolution

 04/06/2017 - 16:29
Merliz Gomez is the chef of the Venezuelan restaurant Tartarepería 18.64, located in Fishtown. Photos: Eli Siegel.
 

Two new Venezuelan Restaurants, “Tartareperia 18.64,” and “Puyero Venezuelan Flavor”, mark the latest addition to the rich Latino cuisine of Philadelphia. They are part of a revolution in the city’s cuisine that traces its roots almost 30 years ago.

 

Plain Text Author: 
Eli Siegel