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[OP-ED]: Growing disgust with the ethos of college campuses does not mean a rejection of higher education

 07/18/2017 - 15:00
According to the National Student Clearinghouse, which tracks college enrollments, the number of students in colleges and universities has now dropped for five straight years, and this year 81,000 fewer high school graduates nationwide are heading to higher-education institutions. 

A recent survey on the public’s view of national institutions elicited headlines that suggested a tale of backwardness and ignorance. One example: “Majority of Republicans Think Higher Education is Bad for America.” 

The reality is more complex.

[OP-ED]: America’s internet delusion

 05/22/2017 - 08:51
If there are deficiencies with cybersecurity, we consider them separately. We embrace the “internet of things” without admitting that it’s also the “internet of hazards.”

The United States may have escaped most digital damage from the global “ransomware” virus, though cyber experts fear more attacks. One possible explanation is that the malicious software (”malware”) harms older versions of Microsoft’s Windows operating system, which most Americans have replaced. Perhaps many users in other countries haven’t. Whatever the explanation, this is not the end of internet threats.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

FBI chief: I felt nauseous to think I could have influenced US election

 05/04/2017 - 04:42
FBI Director James Comey testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on 'Oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.' on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, USA, 03 May 2017. EPA/SHAWN THEW

 FBI Director James Comey told senators on Wednesday that he felt "mildly nauseous" thinking that his investigation of Hillary Clinton could have influenced the 2016 presidential election, but he strongly defended his decision to reopen the probe when there were just 11 days left before the vote.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE

Senators confirm they will question Trump's son-in-law in Russia probe

 03/30/2017 - 04:09
Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Republican Richard Burr (R) and ranking member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Democrat Mark Warner (L) hold a news conference on the committee's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, USA, 29 March 2017. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS

The heads of the Senate Intelligence Committee confirmed Wednesday that they will question Jared Kushner, the son-in-law of President Donald Trump, in their investigation into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 elections and Moscow's possible links with the magnate's campaign.

Plain Text Author: 
EFE