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[OP-ED]: El gran debate de Trump sobre el crecimiento económico

 08/15/2017 - 10:01
No hay suficiente dinero para satisfacer todas nuestras demandas, incluso a tasas más altas de crecimiento económico. Habrá conflictos entre gastos privados y gubernamentales; entre gastos nacionales y locales; entre gastos de salud y gastos de no-salud; y entre gastos dedicados a los ancianos versus los jóvenes. El presente es polémico; el futuro quizás sea peor.

La discusión entre el gobierno de Trump y sus críticos sobre una tasa de crecimiento económico sostenible suscita profundas preguntas sobre el futuro de Estados Unidos. ¿Ingresamos en un período prolongado de crecimiento económico lento? Si es así, ¿cómo altera eso la sociedad y la política? ¿O acaso las medidas “correctas” elevarán el crecimiento económico a niveles del pasado?

[OP-ED]: Trump’s great growth debate

 08/09/2017 - 08:58
There isn’t enough money to satisfy all our demands, even at higher rates of economic growth. There will be conflicts between private and governmental spending; between national and local spending; between health spending and non-health spending; and between spending on the old versus the young. The present is contentious; the future may be worse.

The argument between the Trump administration and its critics over a sustainable rate of economic growth raises profound questions about America’s future. Have we entered a prolonged period of slow growth? If so, how does that alter society and politics? Or will the “right” policies raise growth to past levels? 

If you haven’t paid attention, here’s a brief overview of the debate.

[OP-ED]: On North Korea, hope is not a strategy

 07/11/2017 - 15:46
Kim Jong Un is a young man but has been highly effective at preserving his authority. He has secured the support of the military and sidelined or killed anyone who threatened his grip on power -- including his uncle and, allegedly, his half-brother. EFE

In Washington, there is a conventional wisdom on North Korea that spans both parties and much of elite opinion. It goes roughly like this: North Korea is the world’s most bizarre country, run by a crackpot dictator with a strange haircut. He is unpredictable and irrational and cannot be negotiated with. Eventually this weird and cruel regime will collapse. Meanwhile, the only solution is more and more pressure. But what if the conventional wisdom is wrong?

In Search of the Maya World: From Central America to Philadelphia

 06/27/2017 - 14:26
Gallery of archaeological pieces of Mayan culture exhibited at the Museum of Archeology and Anthropology of the University of Pennsylvania. Photo: Supplied UPEnn

One of the most intriguing mysteries of Latin American culture is what happened to the Maya civilization. How come after over 3,000 years of history, from about 2, 500 BC to 950 AD, most of the glorious Maya centers in Mesoamerica were abandoned? Before the arrival of the Europeans in the 1500’s magnificent cities like Tikal in Guatemala and Copán in Honduras had all but disappeared; left uninhabited, they were covered by thick jungle growth, hidden throughout the mountains and the lowlands. 

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A House Divided: Why the Republican healthcare bill was doomed and what to do next?

 03/25/2017 - 05:47
US President Donald Trump reacts after Republicans pulled their health care bill from the House floor on Friday in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, 24 March 2017, as US Vice President Mike Pence (R) and US Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) Tom Price (L) look on. EPA/Olivier Douliery / POOL

Backing off from their key campaign promise marks a big defeat for both Ryan and the president, who’d pushed hard for the bill and then pressed for a vote on it. Trump is now presenting himself as a bystander to the loss, and Republican voters may well side with him.

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[OP-ED]: Should the Fed run the economy ‘hot’?

 03/14/2017 - 17:44
The recovery, though encouraging, is certainly no economic panacea. Mounting inequality remains a big issue. From 2000 to 2016, the best-paid 5 percent of men achieved a 30 percent wage increase, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data analyzed by Gould. For women, the comparable gain was 24 percent.

Toward the end of 1942, Winston Churchill, in announcing a rare victory over the German army, uttered one of his more memorable phrases: “This is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.” The same might be said today of the American economic recovery. Progress, though real, is incomplete.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Why economists can’t forecast

 03/08/2017 - 19:06
Chevron Chief Executive John Sanders Watson during the company's executive and guest visit to celebrate the 95th anniversary of its entry into the financial market on the New York Stock Exchange. EFE

You knew it all along: Economists can’t forecast the economy worth a hoot. And now we have a scholarly study that confirms it. Better yet, the corroboration comes from an impeccable source: the Federal Reserve.

The study compared predictions of important economic indicators -- unemployment, inflation, interest rates, gross domestic product -- with the actual outcomes. There were widespread errors. The study concluded that “considerable uncertainty surrounds all macroeconomic projections.”

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Has America gone complacent?

 03/03/2017 - 10:10
Photograph provided by the New York Stock Exchange that shows the president of Santander Consumer Finance, the Group's consumer finance unit, Jason Kulas (C) along with other colleagues after opening the session of the New York park in the United States. EFE

”We have met the enemy and he is us.”

- the comic-strip character Pogo by Walt Kelly, 1970

The same may be true of the economy. So says Tyler Cowen, author of the new book “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream.”

Although we’ve recovered from the Great Recession, there are widespread fears that the economy will stagnate or grow only slowly. Government won’t be able to handle the next crisis, whether a war, financial meltdown or pandemic.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: The Age of Disbelief

 02/28/2017 - 16:14
There are plenty of skeptics -- including me -- who think Trump’s agenda is largely impractical or undesirable. To take one example: Since at least John F. Kennedy, presidents have pledged to increase economic growth.

We live in an age of disbelief. Many of the ideas and institutions that have underpinned Americans’ thinking since the early years after World War II are besieged. There is an intellectual and political vacuum into which rush new figures (Donald Trump) and different ideas (America First). These new ideas and leaders may be no better than the ones they displace -- they may, in fact, be worse -- but they have the virtue of being new.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: The Return of the center

 02/28/2017 - 15:33

Polls indicate that the far-right candidate, Marine Le Pen, is leading the field of candidates in the first round with about 25 percent of the vote. But in the second round, which pits only the two front-runners against one another, Macron is projected to beat her handily. EFE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

By now it is settled wisdom that we are witnessing the rise of radical forces on the left and right around the globe. Populists of both varieties, who share a disdain for globalization, are energized, and certain that the future is going their way. But the center is rising again, even in the heart of the old world.

Plain Text Author: 
Fareed Zakaria

[OP-ED]: The real Dodd-Frank scandal

 02/14/2017 - 09:53
Like many others, Geithner -- a critical player in containing the breakdown -- doubts the United States faces “a major financial crisis anytime soon.” To justify this, he offers both statistics and common sense. Foto: today.com
 
 

Comes now Timothy Geithner, treasury secretary from 2009 to 2013, to tell you that much of what you “know” about Dodd-Frank -- Congress’ response to the 2008-09 financial crisis -- is wrong. It’s a timely review because the Trump administration is promising to overhaul the law. The title of Geithner’s essay, carried in the current issue of Foreign Affairs, is simple: “Are We Safe Yet?” The answer is not so simple.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Is corporate ‘short-termism’ a myth?

 02/10/2017 - 07:11
When the business climate is exceptionally uncertain, there’s a natural inclination to hold back. Whatever ails the U.S. economy, it’s a lot more complicated than selfish short-termism.

You’ve heard the criticism. Too many American corporate managers are addicted to “short-termism.” They postpone investments and other costs, sacrificing future performance for present profitability. Either they’re pressured by “activist investors” or want to inflate the value of their stock options. If true, it could help explain the economy’s lackluster performance. Now, a new study asserts that it is true.

The study is intriguing -- but be skeptical; it has some glaring weaknesses.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

Gobierno local donará $300,000 para la construcción de June 5th Memorial Park

 06/08/2015 - 16:15
El alcalde de Filadelfia Michael Nutter presentó a los familiares de las seis personas que murieron el 5 de junio del 2013 en el colapso del edificio, localizado en Market y 22th Street, con réplicas de las ventanas de colores que se incluirán en la escultura conmemorativa.

La semana pasada familiares, amigos y funcionarios de la ciudad se reunieron para recordar a las víctimas, evento en el que también se dio a conocer el diseño del futuro parque en el que se planea construir una escultura conmemorativa en honor a las víctimas bajo el nombre “June 5th Memorial Park”.

Plain Text Author: 
Ana Gamboa
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