climate change

[OP-ED]: Trump’s trade trap

 07/11/2017 - 15:30
Trump may believe that trade and environmental issues can be kept separate from geopolitical matters, such as North Korea’s nuclear program. On the contrary, history suggests that trade and geopolitics go hand in hand. EFE

Donald Trump’s foreign policy, such as it is, rests on a massive and apparently indestructible contradiction. Trump wants the United States to remain the “essential” nation, the best embodiment of Western ideals of freedom and democracy, while at the same time deliberately alienating many of our traditional “allies,” whose support the United States desperately needs. American leadership becomes difficult, if not impossible.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 3:15pm

[OP-ED]: The real problem for the Democrats

 07/04/2017 - 16:02
The Democratic Party has reacted to its series of recent election losses by once again concluding that it needs a better economic message. As Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said last Sunday, “Democrats need a strong, bold, sharp-edged and common-sense economic agenda.” EFE

The only disagreement within the party is about how sharp-edged and left-wing that message should be. But it is increasingly clear that the problem for Democrats has little to do with economics and much more to do with a cluster of issues they would rather not revisit -- about culture, social mores and national identity.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017 - 4:00pm

US-India: Trump and Modi pledge cooperation, avoid tensions on immigration

 06/27/2017 - 06:57
US President Donald J. Trump (R), with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (L), delivers remarks during a ceremony in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, USA, 26 June 2017. EPA/SHAWN THEW

In their first official meeting, the President of the United States and the Indian Prime Minister talked about trade and defense cooperation, terrorism, but avoided immigration and climate change, issues in which both leaders differ. India is the country most affected by Trump's decision to tighten controls on granting the H-1B visa, which benefits foreign workers.

 

Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 6:45am
Plain Text Author: 
EFE

[OP-ED]: What really happened to coal?

 06/12/2017 - 08:58
Even if environmental regulation and climate change didn’t exist, the coal industry would have faced intense pressures to change and adapt. Government isn’t killing the coal industry. “Progress is the culprit,” concludes Kolstad’s study.

 The coal-mining jobs that President Trump thinks were destroyed by government regulation -- adopted to combat air pollution and global warming -- were actually lost to old-fashioned competition from other American firms and workers. Eastern coal mines lost market share to Western coal, which was cheaper. And natural gas grew at coal’s expense because it had low costs and lower greenhouse gas emissions.

Monday, June 12, 2017 - 8:45am

[OP-ED]: The messy reality of global warming

 06/07/2017 - 10:10
Based on present technology and knowledge, we don’t know how to solve global warming. There is no obvious way to eliminate our pervasive dependence on fossil fuels without plunging the world into a prolonged depression and inviting widespread civil strife. 

There was no need for President Trump to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate agreement to achieve his goal of overturning the Obama administration’s global warming policy. This had already occurred through court rulings and executive orders, which effectively halted higher vehicle fuel economy standards (up to 54.5 miles per gallon) and ended the Clean Power Plan program, which pushed electric utilities to shift away from coal.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 9:45am

[OP-ED]: Trump’s radical doctrine of retreat

 06/06/2017 - 16:54
Las consecuencias de la postura y de las acciones de Trump son difíciles de prever. Podrían resultar en el lento deterioro del orden internacional liberal. Podrían significar el auge de un orden nuevo y no tan liberal, promovido por China e India, ambos países mercantilistas y nacionalistas. EFE

We now have a Trump Doctrine, and it is, in its conception at least, the most radical departure from a bipartisan American foreign policy since 1945. In an op-ed for The Wall Street Journal, National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn and national security adviser H.R. McMaster explain that President Trump has “a clear-eyed outlook that the world is not a ‘global community’ but an arena where nations, nongovernmental actors and businesses engage and compete for advantage.”

Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 4:45pm

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