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Women walk past a poster welcoming the Pope Francis's apostolic visit in front of Saint Anthony's Parish in Yangon, Myanmar, 26 November 2017. EPA-EFE/LYNN BO BO
Andrea Rodés/EFE

Pope Francis arrived today in Myanmar in a delicate diplomatic mission, as thousands of stateless Muslims have fled the atrocities at the hands of the military.

[OP-ED]: Is your phone eavesdropping on your conversation about cannibalism? Mine may have.

 03/08/2017 - 18:41

Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you were to read biology professor Bill Schutt’s new book “Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,” you’d have lots to talk about at the dinner table.

There are, for instance, sections on how cannibalism is portrayed in popular culture, news stories and historical texts. Schutt investigates -- with dark humor -- how cannibalism works within different animal species and how it’s understood by humans of different nations, cultures and religions. Somehow he makes the subject fascinating, rather than gruesome.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

God Pays

 12/02/2016 - 06:43
Saint Mary's Church, Hamilton Village, Philadelphia. Photo: COMMONS Wikimedia

Churches not only bring faith and civic value, but also an economic value, an "economic halo" that averages $1.5 million per congregation in Philadelphia, according to a recent report by Partners for Sacred Places and University of Pennsylvania professor Ram Cnaan.

That report, "How Catholic Places Serve Civic Purposes: The Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Economic 'Halo Effects,' " put the economic weight of the archdiocese and other Catholic entities in Southeastern Pennsylvania at $4.2 billion in fiscal 2015.