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The political scientist Darío Villamizar during the presentation of his new book "The guerrillas in Colombia" in Barcelona, the 27 of September of 2017. Photo: Casa America Catalunya

Colombian political scientist Darío Villamizar presents his book "The guerrillas in Colombia" where he tells and analyzes the almost 70 years of this contemporary armed political conflict, still in the process of being resolved.

[OP-ED]: ¿Harán ahora perfiles étnicos de los blancos, como lo hacen del resto de nosotros?

 08/21/2017 - 11:06
Un contra-manifestante grita a los policías antidisturbios tras los rumores de una marcha planeada por el KKK y otros grupos de supremacía blanca, en Durham, Carolina del Norte, Estados Unidos. EFE

Si es cierto, como algunos afirman, que por el aumento en la estridencia de los supremacistas blancos es aceptable mostrar prejuicios raciales, entonces los blancos comenzarán a sentir el dolor de ser asociados con un pequeño grupo radical de racistas extremos.

[OP-ED]: The Democrats should rethink immigration absolutism

 08/08/2017 - 08:09
Republican senators from North Carolina Thom Tillis, Wyoming John Barrsso (left) and Texas John Cornyn give a press conference to present the Republican legislative proposal to increase border security and tightening of immigration laws on Capitol Hill, Washington DC (United States). EFE

In 1992, the Democratic Party faced a challenge on the issue of abortion. Pennsylvania’s governor, Robert Casey, a Democrat dedicated to the working class, asked to speak at the national convention in New York City. He wanted to propose a pro-life plank for the party platform, mostly as a way of affirming his Catholic beliefs.

[OP-ED]: Amid Trump’s chaos, a post-American world emerges

 08/01/2017 - 09:10
In 2008, I wrote a book about the emerging “Post-American World,” which was, I noted at the start, not about the decline of America but rather the rise of the rest. Amid the parochialism, ineptitude and sheer disarray of the Trump presidency, the post-American world is coming to fruition much faster than I ever expected.

 In London last week, I met a Nigerian man who succinctly expressed the reaction of much of the world to America these days. “Your country has gone crazy,” he said, with a mixture of outrage and amusement. “I’m from Africa. I know crazy, but I didn’t ever think I would see this in America!”

[OP-ED]: For those struggling with anxiety, harness the power of positive writing

 07/11/2017 - 10:23
Then Janice Kaplan’s book “The Gratitude Diaries: How a Year Looking on the Bright Side Can Transform Your Life” came out, promising that by just being thankful one could crowd out negative thoughts

Two years ago, anxiety was keeping me up at night, threatening to spiral out of control. Meanwhile, my husband with his easy confidence -- never seeing a raincloud without a silver lining, always constructing the best possible scenario when confronted with a set of hazy details -- slept like a baby. I decided I wanted that kind of peace in my life.

 

[OP-ED]: America & me: A love story

 07/06/2017 - 14:05
A group of deported veterans protested in honor of deported veterans who have died outside the United States, and demanded changes to laws that would give veterans deported access to medical benefits. EFE

At the risk of setting off more fireworks, I’ve spent the days surrounding the Fourth of July trying to answer a question that has perplexed U.S. Latinos for generations. Whether the yardstick is starting businesses, creating jobs, spreading opportunity, serving in uniform or displaying optimism in hard times, America’s largest minority has shown time and again that we love this country. 

But does the country love us back?

Global Cyberattack: What We Need to Worry About?

 06/28/2017 - 06:00
An engineer checks live cyber threat maps and statistics at his office in Istanbul, Turkey, 27 June 2017. EPA/ERDEM SAHIN

Most damaging acts of cyber aggression have not been 'acts of war' according to the rigid standards of international law. Thus governments and international organisations struggle to prescribe an effective response to cyber actions -- even as they continue to cause grave economic, social, and political harm, Oxford expert says.  

Author: 

[OP-ED]: It’s getting harder to tell the journalists from the performers

 06/26/2017 - 08:29
En abril de 2015, mientras trabajaba como corresponsal político en jefe para Politico, Thrush envió una serie inapropiada de emails al presidente de la campaña de Hillary Clinton, John Poodesta. En uno de ellos, Thrush dijo a Podesta que estaba trabajando en una historia de recaudación de fondos y preguntó:”¿Puedo mandarte un par de párrafos, extraoficialmente, para asegurarme de que no meto la pata en nada?”. nytimes.com

Americans sense that Big Media is a big mess, but they can’t put their finger on why that is. 

Memory takes me back to August 1997, when I arrived in Phoenix to start my first full-time newspaper job as a general assignment reporter. I was greeted by the managing editor, an old-school journalist who spelled out the rules of the profession and made clear what he expected from me.

[OP-ED]: By all means, take issue with ‘The Bell Curve.’ But read it first

 06/23/2017 - 08:47
t’s a shame that the controversy regarding “The Bell Curve” centered on the book’s delineation of the differences in measured intelligence between blacks and whites

When “The Bell Curve” by Charles A. Murray and Richard Herrnstein was published in 1994, I was a junior in college and didn’t know anything about the book except that it had my white literature professors in an uproar. A few of them inveighed against the book’s premise -- the very notion of intelligence as something people possess in varying degrees -- and then the whole controversy eventually died out.

[OP-ED]: America’s postindustrial blues

 06/22/2017 - 09:43
Says Richard Reeves of the Brookings Institution in his new book “Dream Hoarders.” We should not be surprised that 58 percent of whites and 67 percent of whites without a college degree voted for Trump.

Ever since Donald Trump’s election, a cottage industry of politicians, journalists, scholars and commentators has sought to understand what motivates Trump supporters. Theories have ranged from globalization to a rebellion against Washington elitism to racism. But the true cause may have been overlooked: the “postindustrial society.”

[OP-ED]: Rather than heading to the silver screen, take a moment this summer to look inward

 06/16/2017 - 12:30
Try Michael Sandel’s “Justice: What’s the Right Thing To Do?,” which covers a wide range of thought provoking questions about civic life and describes the philosophical foundations for competing impulses. (The wonderful 12-hour Harvard lecture series is available to view on YouTube, as well.)

 Last week, I packed my husband and two sons off to enjoy their much-anticipated viewing of the new superhero movie “Wonder Woman.”

I used to partake in such outings to the summer action blockbuster, but by the time “Wonder Woman” came out, I was already sick and tired of being browbeaten by countless feminine-power “hot takes” and “think pieces,” plus the inevitable reports of outrage.