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Community leaders and public officials appear at a press conference in front of a Starbucks coffee shop in downtown Philadelphia, United States, on Monday, April 16, 2018, two days after two black men were arrested at the facility. EFE / Bastiaan Slabbers

The controversy of the coffee company for racism is again evidence of a problem rooted in American culture.

[OP-ED]: ¿Harán ahora perfiles étnicos de los blancos, como lo hacen del resto de nosotros?

 08/21/2017 - 11:06
Un contra-manifestante grita a los policías antidisturbios tras los rumores de una marcha planeada por el KKK y otros grupos de supremacía blanca, en Durham, Carolina del Norte, Estados Unidos. EFE

Si es cierto, como algunos afirman, que por el aumento en la estridencia de los supremacistas blancos es aceptable mostrar prejuicios raciales, entonces los blancos comenzarán a sentir el dolor de ser asociados con un pequeño grupo radical de racistas extremos.

[OP-ED]: It’s getting harder to tell the journalists from the performers

 06/26/2017 - 08:29
En abril de 2015, mientras trabajaba como corresponsal político en jefe para Politico, Thrush envió una serie inapropiada de emails al presidente de la campaña de Hillary Clinton, John Poodesta. En uno de ellos, Thrush dijo a Podesta que estaba trabajando en una historia de recaudación de fondos y preguntó:”¿Puedo mandarte un par de párrafos, extraoficialmente, para asegurarme de que no meto la pata en nada?”. nytimes.com

Americans sense that Big Media is a big mess, but they can’t put their finger on why that is. 

Memory takes me back to August 1997, when I arrived in Phoenix to start my first full-time newspaper job as a general assignment reporter. I was greeted by the managing editor, an old-school journalist who spelled out the rules of the profession and made clear what he expected from me.

[OP-ED]: By all means, take issue with ‘The Bell Curve.’ But read it first

 06/23/2017 - 08:47
t’s a shame that the controversy regarding “The Bell Curve” centered on the book’s delineation of the differences in measured intelligence between blacks and whites

When “The Bell Curve” by Charles A. Murray and Richard Herrnstein was published in 1994, I was a junior in college and didn’t know anything about the book except that it had my white literature professors in an uproar. A few of them inveighed against the book’s premise -- the very notion of intelligence as something people possess in varying degrees -- and then the whole controversy eventually died out.

[OP-ED]: Those in the ‘resistance’ should refrain from mocking Trump’s supporters

 05/16/2017 - 15:29
According to an analysis of post-election survey data conducted by the Public Religion Research Institute and The Atlantic, financially troubled voters in the white working class were more likely to prefer Hillary Clinton over Trump.

Though it’s generally a happy home, there is a stark cultural divide in my house: My husband, who was raised in a tiny, Southern rural town that was almost 100 percent white, loves “The Andy Griffith Show.”

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

[OP-ED]: Who’s afraid of the ‘administrative state’?

 03/07/2017 - 15:28
It’s time to make the administrative state a mainstream concept, through the creation of a regulatory budget. The point is not to justify the instant repeal of most rules, as Bannon’s critics fear, but to improve understanding and accountability.

Just what White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon meant when he recently suggested “deconstructing the administrative state” is unclear. To critics, he would gut the whole superstructure of social and environmental safeguards, starting with the Environmental Protection Agency (which, say news reports, may face a staff cut of one-fifth). But regardless of Bannon’s meaning, the relentless growth of the administrative state is a reality that we can’t escape.

Plain Text Author: 
Robert J. Samuelson

[OP-ED]: Racism and the Trump effect at the high school where I teach

 02/28/2017 - 15:06
A small group of Mexicans and Americans demonstrated today in two parts of the Mexican capital for the visit to the country by US Secretaries of State, Rex Tillerson, and Interior Security, John Kelly, where they declared through banners "Persona non grata" to the secretaries, an official visit in Mexico, and urged them to stop the hatred, racism and ignorance shown so far by the policies of President Donald Trump. EFE

My two sons used to come home from a day at high school complaining that ludicrous accusations of racism were as common as the desks in the classrooms. I chalked it up to adolescent exaggeration.

After having spent the current academic year as a teacher surrounded by rowdy high-schoolers, I can attest that they were right.

In the hallways, at assemblies, in my classroom, “That’s racist!” was a common refrain for most of the early fall.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

Lies Deserve No Sympathy

 06/30/2011 - 17:56
Lies Deserve No Sympathy

CHICAGO -- In retelling last week's revelation that Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas is an illegal immigrant, civil rights metaphors have been trotted out to describe the plight of a talented young man who got caught up in an immigration mess but, through his shocking confession, has become to some people a new American hero.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda

The Bias of Poverty

 06/11/2011 - 05:02
The Bias of Poverty

 Chicago -- Scholars from the Harvard Business School and Tufts University's
Department of Psychology recently confirmed the obvious in contemporary
American race relations. The title of their report, 'Whites See Racism as a
Zero-Sum Game That They Are Now Losing' pretty much says it all.

Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda