Advertisement

America

[OP-ED]: America’s elites respond to Trump with cowardice

 08/24/2017 - 08:14
Counter-protesters gather on Mount Vernon Street after chasing a supporter of US President Donald Trump in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Thousands of both white nationalists or the 'Alt-Right' and counter protesters have organized protests in Boston. EFE

Much of America has reacted swiftly and strongly to Donald Trump’s grotesque suggestion that there is a moral equivalence between the white supremacists who converged last weekend on Charlottesville, Virginia, and those who protested against them. But the delayed, qualified and mealy mouthed reactions of many in America’s leadership class tell a disturbing story about the country’s elites -- and the reason we are living in an age of populist rebellion.

[OP-ED]:DACA Opponents Are American Dream Killers

 08/22/2017 - 10:14
Prudence Powell (right) with his sons Jalen Latiner (left) and Bryana Nunes (center). Photo: Edwin López Moya AL DÍA News

Among the persons that provided poignant testimonials on positive benefits from DACA during the recent ceremony in Philadelphia’s City Hall commemorating the fifth anniversary of that fair-minded initiative instituted by former President Obama were two persons from countries that few ever connect with the controversy around undocumented immigrants in the United States.

[OP-ED]: The curse of middle-aged capitalism -- for Trump and all of us

 08/21/2017 - 13:57
In 1995, the largest five firms by market “capitalization” (the value of a company’s shares) were old-line businesses: Exxon, AT&T, Coca Cola, General Electric and Merck. By 2015, only Exxon (now Exxon Mobil) remained.

 A persisting puzzle about the U.S. economy is how it can seem both strong and weak. On the one hand, it remains a citadel of innovation, producing new companies like Uber. On the other, the economy is expanding at a snail’s pace of 2 percent annually since 2010. How could both be true? Why isn’t innovation translating into faster growth? The answer -- or part of the answer -- is that American businesses are running on two separate tracks. Call them the “youthful” and “middle-aged” tracks.

[OP-ED]: ¿Harán ahora perfiles étnicos de los blancos, como lo hacen del resto de nosotros?

 08/21/2017 - 11:06
Un contra-manifestante grita a los policías antidisturbios tras los rumores de una marcha planeada por el KKK y otros grupos de supremacía blanca, en Durham, Carolina del Norte, Estados Unidos. EFE

Si es cierto, como algunos afirman, que por el aumento en la estridencia de los supremacistas blancos es aceptable mostrar prejuicios raciales, entonces los blancos comenzarán a sentir el dolor de ser asociados con un pequeño grupo radical de racistas extremos.

Latest Stories

To some extent, the future of America depends on Donald Trump. But it depends even more on how these social and economic trends evolve -- how we cope with them and whether we become a more cohesive society or a more contentious one. EFE

 It’s time to take a brief break from Donald Trump. Whatever you think of him, there’s no denying that he dominates the news cycle. We seem to assume that the nation’s future depends on Trump’s fate, for better or worse. The reality is otherwise: The nation’s future also hangs on larger economic and social trends that no president can shape.