1960s

[OP-ED]: America’s postindustrial blues

 06/22/2017 - 09:43
Says Richard Reeves of the Brookings Institution in his new book “Dream Hoarders.” We should not be surprised that 58 percent of whites and 67 percent of whites without a college degree voted for Trump.
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Ever since Donald Trump’s election, a cottage industry of politicians, journalists, scholars and commentators has sought to understand what motivates Trump supporters. Theories have ranged from globalization to a rebellion against Washington elitism to racism. But the true cause may have been overlooked: the “postindustrial society.”

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Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 9:30am
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Says Richard Reeves of the Brookings Institution in his new book “Dream Hoarders.” We should not be surprised that 58 percent of whites and 67 percent of whites without a college degree voted for Trump.

A Guatemalan indigenous land rights activist wins the Goldman Environmental Prize

 04/25/2017 - 03:26
Guatemalan indigenous leader Rodrigo Tot poses during an interview with EFE in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Apr. 24, 2017. EFE/Esteban Biba

Rodrigo Tot, born in central Guatemala during the mining boom of the 1960s, spent much of his 59 years in a tenacious battle against the mining industry in the Lake Izabal region.

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Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 3:15am
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EFE
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Guatemalan indigenous leader Rodrigo Tot poses during an interview with EFE in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Apr. 24, 2017. EFE/Esteban Biba

Mapping the History of Latino Urban Riots

 04/12/2017 - 03:46
An African-American youth at a segregated drinking fountain in Halifax, North Carolina, in 1938. Photo: John Vachon for U.S. Farm Security Administration - Library of Congress.
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Urban rebellions in the United States are largely seen as the byproduct of African American rage. Thus, some Latinos might feel embarrassed that identical outbreaks of violence have occurred in the community.

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Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 3:30am
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An African-American youth at a segregated drinking fountain in Halifax, North Carolina, in 1938. Photo: John Vachon for U.S. Farm Security Administration - Library of Congress.

[OP-ED]: Is the American dream on a ‘self-defeating quest’?

 04/04/2017 - 15:06
 La mayor parte del nuevo libro del economista Tyler Cowen, titulado “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream”, es una lectura mega-deprimente.

Inequality is rising. Segregation by socioeconomic class, educational attainment and race is skyrocketing. The country is generally less dynamic and more risk-averse -- when people have the opportunity to move for a better quality of life or more rewarding job, they tend to settle for staying put.

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Posted Date: 
Friday, March 31, 2017 - 9:45am
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Esther Cepeda
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Most of economist Tyler Cowen’s new book, “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream,” is a mega-depressing read.

[OP-ED]: The national slush fund

 03/27/2017 - 09:29
El presidente de EE.UU., Donald Trump (i), y la administradora de los Centros de los programas de seguros de salud Medicare y Medicaid, Seema Verma (d), durante un panel sobre el plan sanitario republicano en la Sala Roosevelt de la Casa Blanca en Washington, Estados Unidos,

There was bound to be a political commotion when the Trump administration released its 2018 budget.

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Monday, March 27, 2017 - 8:30am
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Robert J. Samuelson
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President Donald Trump and Republican congressional leaders on Wednesday redoubled their efforts to try and secure the necessary votes to pass their healthcare reform bill in the House of Representatives later this week.

[OP-ED]: Has America gone complacent?

 03/03/2017 - 10:10
Photograph provided by the New York Stock Exchange that shows the president of Santander Consumer Finance, the Group's consumer finance unit, Jason Kulas (C) along with other colleagues after opening the session of the New York park in the United States. EFE

”We have met the enemy and he is us.”

- the comic-strip character Pogo by Walt Kelly, 1970

The same may be true of the economy. So says Tyler Cowen, author of the new book “The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream.”

Although we’ve recovered from the Great Recession, there are widespread fears that the economy will stagnate or grow only slowly. Government won’t be able to handle the next crisis, whether a war, financial meltdown or pandemic.

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Friday, March 3, 2017 - 9:52am
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Robert J. Samuelson
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Photograph provided by the New York Stock Exchange that shows the president of Santander Consumer Finance, the Group's consumer finance unit, Jason Kulas (C) along with other colleagues after opening the session of the New York park in the United States. EFE

[OP-ED]: Why Trump loves to hate the media

 02/23/2017 - 09:02
 
The Washington Post’s fact checkers -- Glenn Kessler and Michelle Ye Hee Lee -- found 15 examples of falsehoods or dubious claims. If people don’t believe the press, findings like these will matter less, if at all. EFE

There was a brief moment after Donald Trump’s election when it was conceivable to ask whether he would strive to be a “uniter” or a “divider.” The moment passed quickly as Trump made it clear that he does not intend to abandon the style of politics -- insulting and divisive -- that got him elected. His declaration last week that the news media are “the enemy of the American people” is but the latest reminder.

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Thursday, February 23, 2017 - 8:08am
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Robert J. Samuelson
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The Washington Post’s fact checkers -- Glenn Kessler and Michelle Ye Hee Lee -- found 15 examples of falsehoods or dubious claims. If people don’t believe the press, findings like these will matter less, if at all. EFE

[OP-ED]: Stephen Bannon’s Ideas -- and His Very Different Actions

 02/14/2017 - 14:50
White House Director of Strategic Communications Hope Hicks (L) and Senior Counselor to the President and White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon walk down the West Wing Colonnade following a bilateral meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the White House in Washington, DC, USA. EFE

Perhaps it’s just me, but a few weeks into the Trump presidency, between the tweets, executive orders, attacks and counterattacks, I feel dizzy. So I’ve decided to take a break from the daily barrage and try to find the signal amid the noise: What is the underlying philosophy of this administration?

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Tuesday, February 14, 2017 - 2:28pm
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Fareed Zakaria
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White House Director of Strategic Communications Hope Hicks (L) and Senior Counselor to the President and White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon walk down the West Wing Colonnade following a bilateral meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the White House in Washington, DC, USA. EFE

Is there a Puerto Rican Vote?

 10/20/2016 - 22:36
Voters sign up on election day. Photo: ThinkStock/ 2016

The question of a Puerto Rican vote is a highlight of the 2016 election. 

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Posted Date: 
Friday, October 21, 2016 - 10:30am
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Jamila Johnson
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Voters sign up on election day. Photo: ThinkStock/ 2016

Capital of latino affluence

 11/09/2010 - 04:04
Capital of latino affluence
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Chicago- My first visit to Washington, D.C., occurred when I was 7. The town impressed several things upon my young brain: Compared to Chicago, the buildings were all squat and white, and traffic was horrendous. But it was where the president lived and therefore the world's center of power. 

     The family had traveled there to visit my dad's cousin Lupe, who turned out to be one of a wave of what a recent Washington Post article called the "educated elite" from Latin America who came to the nation's capital in the 1960s, '70s and '80s. 

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Plain Text Author: 
Esther Cepeda